T. Mark Montoya, PhD

T. Mark Montoya Assistant Professor, College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Teacher of the Year 2015-2016
Northern Arizona University
Ethnic Studies
Blg SBS West 70 Rm #226
Phone: 928-523-5502

Interests

  • Chicanx/Latinx Studies
  • U.S.-Mexico Borderlands
  • Race Politics
  • First-Generation Student Experiences
  • Citizenship
  • Hip Hop

Biography

T. Mark Montoya, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Northern Arizona University. Dr. Montoya’s research and teaching focus on Chicanx/Latinx Studies, U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, Race Politics, First-Generation Student Experiences, Citizenship, and Hip-Hop. Montoya has also been involved with NAU's First-Generation Programs and Student Initiatives, NAU's New Student Orientation, the Northern Arizona Dream Fund, and the Board of Directors for the Association for Borderlands Studies. In addition, he is the faculty advisor to two student organizations (MEChA de NAU and Omega Delta Phi), and is the co-organizer of NAU’s Hip-Hop Week. Montoya was named the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Teacher of the Year for the 2015-2016 Academic Year, and he serves with NAU’s Teaching Academy.

Recent Publications

Montoya, T. Mark. 2016. “Bad Fences Make Bad Neighbors: Challenging the Citizenship Regime in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.” Eurasia Border Review, 7(1): 71-85.

Montoya, T. Mark. 2016. “But It’s a Dry Hate: Illegal-Americans, Other-Americans, and the Citizenship Regime.” In White Washing American Education: The New Culture Wars in Ethnic Studies, Volume 2: Higher Education, ed D.M. Sandoval, A.J. Ratcliff, T.L. Buenavista, and J.R. Marin, 19-40. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Publishers.

Montoya, T. Mark. 2016. “Rage, Courage, Encourage: Citizenship in the College Classroom.” In Going Inward: The Role of Cultural Introspection in College Teaching, ed S.D. Longerbeam and A.F. Chávez, 162-169. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

Montoya, T. Mark. 2013. “Emergent Indigenous Identities at the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.”  In The Politics of Identity: Emerging Indigeneity, ed. M. Harris, M. Nakata, and B. Carlson, 78-108. Sydney, AU: University of Technology Sydney Press/Sydney University Press.