Fall 2012 Courses

FS 111, 121, 131, 141 are 3 unit courses designed for first year students for Liberal Studies distribution block credit.

FS 111 = Science (non-lab)
FS 121 = Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry
FS 131 = Cultural Understanding
FS 141 = Social & Political Worlds

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course with an Action Research Team
These Seminars may require students to work together in Action Research Teams on projects identified in consultation with community partners.

Science (non-lab) Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 111  Colorado River  (Joseph Shannon, First Year Seminar Program and Biological Sciences)
This Seminar will focus on the Columbia, Missouri, and Colorado Rivers, while exploring how they are predicted to respond to climate change and increases in human population.  We will examine their geography, hydrology, human development, and climate with regard to each river systems predicted level of sustainability.  Special attention will be given to the Colorado River and local understanding of sustainability.
Contact:  Joseph.Shannon@nau.edu

FS 111 Ecology and Behavior of Bats (Carol Chambers, Forestry)
This Seminar will cover the ecology of bats around the world, emphasizing adaptations that make bats so unique, such as flight and echolocation. We will focus on some of the 28 bat species in Arizona and include field trips and projects to see and learn more about bats and their habitat. By studying this group of animals, students will gain a wider understanding of the role adaptations play in animal use of the environment and processes that shape the natural world. You’ll never be afraid of the dark again.
Contact: Carol.Chambers@nau.edu

FS 111 Endangered – AZ Wildlife at Risk (Lynn Nemeth, First Year Seminar and Biological Sciences)
What do the black-footed ferret, Mexican wolf, and California condor have in common? All are endangered species that Arizona and the federal government have reintroduced in Arizona. Why have these species, and others, been reintroduced? How did they become endangered? This course will allow students to synthesize information from a number of fields, learning about how science and politics intersect to create endangered species. Students will explore the natural history and ecology of endangered Arizona wildlife, visiting reintroduction sites and learning from biologists working in the field. From there, students will delve into the larger issues affecting endangered species, including human activities, the history of US environmental policy, and the Endangered Species Act.
Contact: Lynne.Nemeth@nau.edu

FS 111  Global Sustainability (Stefan Sommer, Biological Sciences)
This Seminar will present our cutting edge understanding of environmental sustainability. Students will learn how sustainability is understood by ecological, social, economic, and engineering experts. We will explore the ways in which people are working to create a more sustainable society.
Contact:   Stefan.Sommer@nau.edu

FS 111  Psychology of Food  (Melissa Birkett, First Year Seminar Program and Psychology)
(Course description forthcoming—contact instructor for any details in the meantime)
Contact:   Melissa.Birkett@nau.edu

FS 111  Western and Alternative Medicine  (Alison Adams, First Year Seminar Program and Biological Sciences)
This class will examine Western, Alternative and Native medicine, with an emphasis on examining the evidence for effectiveness of these various forms of treatment.  For example, how well do anti-depressants work, compared with placebos? How well does acupuncture work, when fake needles are used instead of real needles?  Might crystals, magnets and other types of alternative therapies be useful?  What about Native medicine?  How does a sugar pill or other form of placebo help people feel better?  How should you choose what form of treatment to use?
Contact:  Alison.Adams@nau.edu

Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 121  Animal Performers and Performance  (Season Ellison, Theatre)
What is evident within popular films and novels such as “Marley and Me” and “Water for Elephants,” to American classics such as “Mr. Ed” and “Lassie,” to live performances found at the circus, zoo, or “Cirque du Soliel,” is that our human relationship to non-human animals is incredibly complex. In this Seminar we will use performance (literally and metaphorically) as a way to contemplate this relationship. This Seminar will consist of four primary sections: (1) We will look at live and filmed animal performers and consider the ethics of employing animals for entertainment purposes; (2) We will examine how animals perform in their daily lives and consider what the concept of “performance” can teach us about our animal-human experiences; (3) We will examine the ethics and performance components of animal training, and; (4) We will consider how human-animals perform the non-human animal.
Contact:  Season.Ellison@nau.edu

FS 121  Communication & NAU Community  (Emilly Borthwick-Wong, First Year Seminar Program)
Communication is integral to every facet of our society.   Students in this Seminar will attend activities such as guest lectures, athletic events, films and theater performances on the Northern Arizona University’s campus.  You will have the opportunity to explore and analyze how communication helps to create, maintain and challenge share beliefs.  Students will attend 15 NAU events and then as a class will work to make sense of NAU’s community and analyze how communication helps shape campus culture.
NOTE:  Students enrolled in this course should be prepared to attend an event once a week. The events may take place on weeknights or during the weekend.  Attendance at events outside of class is a mandatory portion of the course.
Contact:   Emilly.Borthwick@nau.edu

FS 121 Conflict & the Human Condition  (Everett Akam, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
“Only the dead have seen the end of war.” So wrote Plato in the third century BC. Through films, novels, and other provocative readings, this course explores the reasons why conflict remains a ubiquitous part of the human condition. Along this journey we will also analyze and fashion our own moral philosophy capable of enhancing peace within our community and throughout the world.
Contact:  Everett.Akam@nau.edu

FS 121  Comics: Pow! Bam! Biff!  (Kevin Ketchner, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
The modern comic book will inform the contextual analysis for this Seminar. We will explore comics from their humble origins in the 1930’s as the reprinted pages of the Sunday newspaper comic strips, to the best-selling graphic novels of today. It will be seen that comics and their heroes soak up and reflect their culture and their times.  This encompasses the battles waged against the Axis powers of World War II, the diversity of themes and social consciousness of the 1960’s and 1970’s, the adaption of popular culture titles such as Star Wars, the reformation of the industry with the advent of the graphic novel and comic-based film, to the current industry as the country redefined it’s place in the world post-9/11.
Contact:   Kevin.Ketchner@nau.edu

FS 121  Environment & Social Change  (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program, and Rom Coles, Community, Culture, and Environment)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Want to learn about the environment through the exploration of social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives?  Ready to have your voices heard and share in dialogue around issues that matter to YOU and the PLANET?  This course will explore community through a very new lens, one that connects living and non-living worlds and addresses how having the right tools to organize can bring about real, on-the-ground positive community change.

How do you feel about renewable energy use on NAU campus, drug and alcohol use, student government sponsored activities, recycling and compost initiatives, LGBT equity issues, sustainable food systems, immigration and civil rights in Arizona, college tuition fees, campus transportation issues, student accountability and waste, accessibility to campus and community services?

Deepen your understanding of citizenship and democracy by practicing it, and by becoming participants and agents of civic change on campus, in Flagstaff, and in your communities at large.  This course is hands-on and exploratory and will ask the students to think through an experiential, learning lens.  The students will have the opportunity to discover the surrounding Flagstaff community and its diverse landscapes on and off campus to establish various areas of interest and identify issues they would like to address and CHANGE. You have a voice and it can be heard! Sign up today for a fun, engaging, and truly meaningful exploration of community through ecological, environmental and social change.
Contact:  Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu

FS 121  Is Civil Discourse Dead?  (Rosalinda Haddon, Nursing)
This is a highly interactive Seminar that will trace the history or conversation in the United States from colonial times to present day. How we converse during expansion, wars, peace, colonialization and with technology will be explored. The end product will be a discourse on a controversial topic.
Contact:  Rosalinda.Haddon@nau.edu

FS 121  King Arthur: Legend, Literature, Film  (John Doherty, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
C.S. Lewis once compared the Arthurian legend to a great medieval cathedral that was built by many over generations.  In this case, it has been 1,500 years in the making, and still going strong.  Since 1900 literature, film and music have contributed more to the Arthurian story than at any other time since it first emerged as oral tales in the Wales of the 500s.  We will briefly examine the first 1,400 years of the story, and then concentrate on the recent additions of film and fiction, including Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Excalibur, The Mists of Avalon, The Crystal Cave, and the recent BBC TV series Merlin.  We will critically examine how the 20th Century has put its own unique spin on a very popular story.
Contact:   John.Doherty@nau.edu

FS 121  New Mind Yourself  (Barbara Sheeley, Art)
There’s a mismatch between the high-tech world we’ve created and the ‘old mind’ we inherit as humans. Contemporary culture requires ways of thinking and responding in alignment with the high stakes of the new century.  To ‘new mind yourself,’ students learn about how the mind creates, modifies and recreates experience using an innovative method of examining art as the starting point. Through guided analyses of different forms of creative expression, we develop active thinking skills that enable more clarity and flexibility. We use these skills to spotlight some important trends within society and around our planet and develop written, visual and verbal presentations focused on issues of local, national and global importance.
Contact:   Barbara.Sheeley@nau.edu

FS 121  Noir in Film & Literature  (Bruce Fox, Forestry)
In this Seminar we will discuss the characteristics and import of noir as it reflects societal values and perspectives—or does not—using a variety of scholarly texts and articles, books, and films.  We will use texts from the Brothers Grimm, Mark Twain, and hard-boiled detective novels from the 1940s and 1950s.   Some classicfilm noir include, but will not be limited to, Chinatown, High Noon, Double Indemnity, Dirty Harry, and I am a Fugitive From aChain Gang.
Contact:  Bruce.Fox@nau.edu

FS 121  Seeds of Change (Kimberley Curtis, First Year Seminar)
Would you like to live in a world where communities grow much of their own food in highly productive small scale sustainable gardens and farms, where energy is wisely used and comes from renewable sources, and where power and respect depend not on the amount of money you have but on your ability to creatively work with others to co-create the world?  Who wouldn’t?  But how do we get there?  How can we become powerful participants in the transition to a more sustainable and more just world?  What do we need to know?  And how do we begin to act? Explore these questions by studying how some of the most visionary social critics answer them, and by formulating your own powerful answers by becoming “seeds of change” as you participate with students and community members in fun and life-changing social action projects such as greening the schools and localizing the food system.
Contact: Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

FS 121  Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar)
Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.
Contact: Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 121   Social Justice – Youth Empowerment   (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program and  Gerald Wood, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them. This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy through the Public Achievement model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers in one of two elementary schools in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.
Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 121   Social Justice-Youth Empowerment   (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program and Gerald Wood, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them. This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy, public work, and citizenship through the Public Achievement (PA) model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers at Kinsey Elementary School in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Student concerns addressed during the after school program will lead to issue identification and grassroots democracy participation.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.  Students will engage in hands-on learning through field work and leadership development.  They will not only develop crucial critical thinking and leadership skills while gaining a deeper understanding of who they are in the world, but will have the opportunity to pass this knowledge down to the next generation of thinkers, doers, and civic agents of change.
Students are required to be available one day a week (flexible) on a weekly Monday through Thursday basis from 3:00-5:00 p.m. to attend Kinsey as a PA coach.
Contact:  Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu

FS 121  What’s Political About Potato? (Kimberley Curtis, First Year Seminar)
Why are so many people flocking to farmer’s markets?  Why are community gardens and backyard gardens popping up in the most socially and ecologically devastated inner cities, on rooftops, and in diverse communities across the country?  Is it a political movement, and if so what are the demands and what is the struggle really about?   Farmers are marching to Wall Street calling on us to “Occupy Food.”   Say what?  What are the problems they identify and what are their visions of social change?  Explore these and many other questions about the food you eat through in-class study, field trips, and by working in action research teams with people in the community in this movement.
Contact: Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

FS 121 Women and Music  (Julie Hedges Brown, Music)
This Seminar explores women in the western art music tradition, the societal constraints under which they worked, and how portrayals of females in opera and song reflect socio-cultural thinking about women.
Contact:   Julie.Brown@nau.edu

Cultural Understanding Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 121  Animal Performers and Performance  (Season Ellison, Theatre)
What is evident within popular films and novels such as “Marley and Me” and “Water for Elephants,” to American classics such as “Mr. Ed” and “Lassie,” to live performances found at the circus, zoo, or “Cirque du Soliel,” is that our human relationship to non-human animals is incredibly complex. In this Seminar we will use performance (literally and metaphorically) as a way to contemplate this relationship. This Seminar will consist of four primary sections: (1) We will look at live and filmed animal performers and consider the ethics of employing animals for entertainment purposes; (2) We will examine how animals perform in their daily lives and consider what the concept of “performance” can teach us about our animal-human experiences; (3) We will examine the ethics and performance components of animal training, and; (4) We will consider how human-animals perform the non-human animal.
Contact:  Season.Ellison@nau.edu

FS 121  Communication & NAU Community  (Emilly Borthwick-Wong, First Year Seminar Program)
Communication is integral to every facet of our society.   Students in this Seminar will attend activities such as guest lectures, athletic events, films and theater performances on the Northern Arizona University’s campus.  You will have the opportunity to explore and analyze how communication helps to create, maintain and challenge share beliefs.  Students will attend 15 NAU events and then as a class will work to make sense of NAU’s community and analyze how communication helps shape campus culture.
NOTE:  Students enrolled in this course should be prepared to attend an event once a week. The events may take place on weeknights or during the weekend.  Attendance at events outside of class is a mandatory portion of the course.
Contact:   Emilly.Borthwick@nau.edu

FS 121 Conflict & the Human Condition  (Everett Akam, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
“Only the dead have seen the end of war.” So wrote Plato in the third century BC. Through films, novels, and other provocative readings, this course explores the reasons why conflict remains a ubiquitous part of the human condition. Along this journey we will also analyze and fashion our own moral philosophy capable of enhancing peace within our community and throughout the world.
Contact:  Everett.Akam@nau.edu

FS 121  Comics: Pow! Bam! Biff!  (Kevin Ketchner, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
The modern comic book will inform the contextual analysis for this Seminar.  We will explore comics from their humble origins in the 1930’s as the reprinted pages of the Sunday newspaper comic strips, to the best-selling graphic novels of today. It will be seen that comics and their heroes soak up and reflect their culture and their times.  This encompasses the battles waged against the Axis powers of World War II, the diversity of themes and social consciousness of the 1960’s and 1970’s, the adaption of popular culture titles such as Star Wars, the reformation of the industry with the advent of the graphic novel and comic-based film, to the current industry as the country redefined it’s place in the world post-9/11.
Contact:   Kevin.Ketchner@nau.edu

FS 121  Environment & Social Change  (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program, and Rom Coles, Community, Culture, and Environment)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Want to learn about the environment through the exploration of social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives?  Ready to have your voices heard and share in dialogue around issues that matter to YOU and the PLANET?  This course will explore community through a very new lens, one that connects living and non-living worlds and addresses how having the right tools to organize can bring about real, on-the-ground positive community change.

How do you feel about renewable energy use on NAU campus, drug and alcohol use, student government sponsored activities, recycling and compost initiatives, LGBT equity issues, sustainable food systems, immigration and civil rights in Arizona, college tuition fees, campus transportation issues, student accountability and waste, accessibility to campus and community services?

Deepen your understanding of citizenship and democracy by practicing it, and by becoming participants and agents of civic change on campus, in Flagstaff, and in your communities at large.  This course is hands-on and exploratory and will ask the students to think through an experiential, learning lens.  The students will have the opportunity to discover the surrounding Flagstaff community and its diverse landscapes on and off campus to establish various areas of interest and identify issues they would like to address and CHANGE.  You have a voice and it can be heard! Sign up today for a fun, engaging, and truly meaningful exploration of community through ecological, environmental and social change.
Contact:  Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu

FS 121  Is Civil Discourse Dead?  (Rosalinda Haddon, Nursing)
This is a highly interactive Seminar that will trace the history or conversation in the United States from colonial times to present day. How we converse during expansion, wars, peace, colonialization and with technology will be explored. The end product will be a discourse on a controversial topic.
Contact:  Rosalinda.Haddon@nau.edu

FS 121 King Arthur: Legend, Literature, Film  (John Doherty, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
C.S. Lewis once compared the Arthurian legend to a great medieval cathedral that was built by many over generations.  In this case, it has been 1,500 years in the making, and still going strong.  Since 1900 literature, film and music have contributed more to the Arthurian story than at any other time since it first emerged as oral tales in the Wales of the 500s.  We will briefly examine the first 1,400 years of the story, and then concentrate on the recent additions of film and fiction, including Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Excalibur, The Mists of Avalon, The Crystal Cave, and the recent BBC TV series Merlin.  We will critically examine how the 20th Century has put its own unique spin on a very popular story.
Contact:   John.Doherty@nau.edu

FS 121  New Mind Yourself  (Barbara Sheeley, Art)
There’s a mismatch between the high-tech world we’ve created and the ‘old mind’ we inherit as humans. Contemporary culture requires ways of thinking and responding in alignment with the high stakes of the new century.  To ‘new mind yourself,’ students learn about how the mind creates, modifies and recreates experience using an innovative method of examining art as the starting point. Through guided analyses of different forms of creative expression, we develop active thinking skills that enable more clarity and flexibility. We use these skills to spotlight some important trends within society and around our planet and develop written, visual and verbal presentations focused on issues of local, national and global importance.
Contact:   Barbara.Sheeley@nau.edu

FS 121  Noir in Film & Literature  (Bruce Fox, Forestry)
In this Seminar we will discuss the characteristics and import of noir as it reflects societal values and perspectives—or does not—using a variety of scholarly texts and articles, books, and films.  We will use texts from the Brothers Grimm, Mark Twain, and hard-boiled detective novels from the 1940s and 1950s.   Some classicfilm noir include, but will not be limited to, Chinatown, High Noon, Double Indemnity, Dirty Harry, and I am a Fugitive From aChain Gang.
Contact:  Bruce.Fox@nau.edu

FS 121  Seeds of Change (Kimberley Curtis, First Year Seminar)
Would you like to live in a world where communities grow much of their own food in highly productive small scale sustainable gardens and farms, where energy is wisely used and comes from renewable sources, and where power and respect depend not on the amount of money you have but on your ability to creatively work with others to co-create the world?  Who wouldn’t?  But how do we get there?  How can we become powerful participants in the transition to a more sustainable and more just world?  What do we need to know?  And how do we begin to act? Explore these questions by studying how some of the most visionary social critics answer them, and by formulating your own powerful answers by becoming “seeds of change” as you participate with students and community members in fun and life-changing social action projects such as greening the schools and localizing the food system.
Contact: Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

FS 121  Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar)
Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.
Contact: Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 121  Social Justice – Youth Empowerment  (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program and  Gerald Wood, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy through the Public Achievement model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers in one of two elementary schools in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.
Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 121  Social Justice-Youth Empowerment  (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program and Gerald Wood, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy, public work, and citizenship through the Public Achievement (PA) model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers at Kinsey Elementary School in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Student concerns addressed during the after school program will lead to issue identification and grassroots democracy participation.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.  Students will engage in hands-on learning through field work and leadership development.  They will not only develop crucial critical thinking and leadership skills while gaining a deeper understanding of who they are in the world, but will have the opportunity to pass this knowledge down to the next generation of thinkers, doers, and civic agents of change.
Students are required to be available one day a week (flexible) on a weekly Monday through Thursday basis from 3:00-5:00 p.m. to attend Kinsey as a PA coach.
Contact:   Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu

FS 121  What’s Political About Potato?  (Kimberley Curtis, First Year Seminar)
Why are so many people flocking to farmer’s markets?  Why are community gardens and backyard gardens popping up in the most socially and ecologically devastated inner cities, on rooftops, and in diverse communities across the country?  Is it a political movement, and if so what are the demands and what is the struggle really about?   Farmers are marching to Wall Street calling on us to “Occupy Food.”   Say what?  What are the problems they identify and what are their visions of social change?  Explore these and many other questions about the food you eat through in-class study, field trips, and by working in action research teams with people in the community in this movement.
Contact: Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

FS 121 Women and Music  (Julie Hedges Brown, Music)
This Seminar explores women in the western art music tradition, the societal constraints under which they worked, and how portrayals of females in opera and song reflect socio-cultural thinking about women.
Contact:   Julie.Brown@nau.edu

Social & Political Worlds Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 141  Adventure & Wildlands (Aaron Divine and Pam Foti, Geography, Planning and Recreation)
The purpose of this Seminar is to investigate adventure and the landscape of adventure. The Seminar will begin with an overview of adventure and the people who have ventured out on the edge and then will move into the areas where adventure occurs with an emphasis on the United States. The Seminar will include a variety of educational activities: lecture, discussion, classroom activities, and required field experiences.
NOTE:  There are required field trips off campus.  Please contact the professor for more information.
Contact:   Aaron.Divine@nau.edu

FS 141 Contemporary International Controversies  (Lori Poloni-Staudinger, Politics and International Affairs)
The purpose of this Seminar is to introduce you to contemporary concepts and topics in the international arena and the operation of politics outside of the United States.  The course will be delivered in a small seminar format allowing for critical analysis and discussion of all topics.  By the end of the course, you should be able to critically evaluate ideas on germane topics of international and comparative politics that will allow you to operate more effectively as world citizens.  Knowledge of the processes shaping governance in other countries around the world and in the international arena is critical for students hoping to enter the global workplace.  In order for you to gain a deeper and broader understanding of the world around you and the issues of contemporary import, this course will focus on several different topics.  Each week will find us delving into a new issue of current importance. Our readings will also enable us to take a holistic approach to understanding controversial issues by examining issues from many different perspectives.  The course will begin with an overview of different types of governance and situate the type of democracy practiced in the United States vis a vis other non-democratic and democratic countries around the world.  We will then move into discussions on certain topics, including transnational environmental issues, terrorism, globalization, social movements, Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, expansion of the European Union, US Hegemony and the “Bush Doctrine”, civil war and ethnic violence, genocide, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Contact:   Lori.Poloni-Staudinger@nau.edu

FS 141  Democracy, Social Justice & the Environment  (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program, and Rom Coles, Community, Culture, and Environment)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
In this Seminar, grassroots democratic participation is explored in relation to problems of environmental sustainability, social justice, and diversity from the local level to the global.  We will examine systemic aspects of social and environmental problems as well as alternative pathways for change.  Community-based research and engagement are a vital component of the course, facilitating a process in which students can participate in fostering the changes that they want to see in the world.
Contact:   Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 141  Ethics for a Global Economy  (Paul Baker, First Year Seminar Program)
As a global economy continues to develop, ethical and cultural issues that affect the international business arena, have become of increasing importance.  This Seminar specifically addresses the following ethical issues: employment practices, consumer protection, environmental issues, bribery, sexual harassment, office theft, basic human rights and fundamental freedoms.  Case study analysis, videos, and guest speakers will provide the student with an increased understanding and sensitivity to these issues.
Contact:   Paul.Baker@nau.edu

FS 141  Global Challenges  (Stephen Wright, Politics and International Affairs)
What are the most important challenges facing us globally in the 21st century? How can we adapt to and cope with these challenges? This Seminar examines these core challenges in today’s world, asking whether their impact holds promise or peril to us, or whether the outcome depends upon how we deal with these challenges. We set out to debate and understand their nature, the political actors involved in dealing with them, the ways in which different societies may react to them, and the level of success (or failure) we think we may have in dealing with them. Included in the global challenges are such issues as population growth and migration; resource management and sustainability; technological innovation; information revolutions; globalized economies; human and military security; and governance.
Contact:   Stephen.Wright@nau.edu

FS 141   The Great Immigration Debate   (Leah Mundell, First Year Seminar Program)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Why has the issue of immigration inflamed the passions of so many across the political spectrum in recent years? In this Seminar, we will explore the history of U.S. immigration policy, the politics of immigration reform, and the cultural implications of immigration in the United States. Students will also have the opportunity to act on the issues discussed in the course by participating in an Immigration Action Research Team in collaboration with local community organizations. Students will choose specific research and action topics and develop strategies for communicating their research to a wide variety of audiences.
Contact:   Leah.Mundell@nau.edu

FS 141   Healthcare – Right or Privilege?  (Lanny Morrison, First Year Seminar Program)
This Seminar will allow students to explore how policy is formulated and implemented to address healthcare issues.  Students will learn how healthcare policy, like the Affordable Care Act (often referred to as Obamacare), is made at the state or national level and what it takes to implement it. Historical examples will be considered for what has and has not worked including unintended consequences of well-intentioned efforts. Students will learn how they, or any other citizen, can act to influence policy.
Contact:  Lanny.Morrison@nau.edu

FS 141  Indigenous Environmental Justice  (Karen Jarratt-Snider, Applied Indigenous Studies)
This Seminar examines the indigenous environmental justice movement at the twenty-year anniversary of the First People of Color Summit on Environmental Justice in 1991.  Students will learn about the history of the movement, environmental justice law and policy created following the summit, and examine specific cases of indigenous environmental justice.  Students will also explore current issues of environmental injustice facing Indigenous communities in the United States, Australia, Canada, various parts of South America, Africa and other parts of the globe.  Topics explored will include the effects of mining, hazardous waste, climate change, protection of sacred lands, water, intellectual property rights and the use of traditional ecological knowledge, and protection of traditional homelands.
Contact:   Karen.Jarrat-Snider@nau.edu

FS 141 Investigating Human Rights  (Cyndi Banks, Criminology & Criminal Justice)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This is a Liberal Studies course in the Social & Political Worlds distribution block and will address the goal of applying appropriate perspectives to analyze a significant human problem.  This course is a first year seminar that explores the applications of human rights theory and action research to issues globally and locally.  The purpose of this course is to raise awareness about the applications of human rights and of human rights issues through the lens of active research approaches.  Investigating Human Rights will examine issues such as poverty, intimate violence, punishment, education, and immigration from global and local perspectives.  Building on an understanding of universal human rights theory and practice, the course will take an active research approach.  During the semester students will partner with the Immigration Action Research Team (ART) to apply their knowledge of human rights to human rights issues reflected in the local context. Throughout the semester emphasis will be placed on critical thinking through the essential skills of effective writing and effective oral communication. The course is interactive and will follow a participatory model.  You are expected to actively engage in analytical discussions that will depend on prior preparation of the assigned readings.  You will also participate in an action research team that will work with a community partner on a contemporary human rights issue.
Contact:   Cyndi.Banks@nau.edu

FS 141  LGBTQ: Identities and Meaning  (Joseph Wegwert, Teaching and Learning)
This Seminar invites students to join together in investigation, discussion, and action as informed by the historical, cultural, and political limitations and possibilities of questions of sexual orientation, gender identities, and gender expression. We will examine the cultural, religious, ideological, and historical underpinnings of the normalization processes and dynamics of gender expression and sexual orientation and will investigate the roles of media, families, and social, cultural, and political institutions as they shape and regulate the meanings of gender, gender performance, and sexual identity. Importantly, this Seminar will also provide opportunities to interrogate and act on the meanings and possibilities of equality and social justice for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning people in American society and throughout the world.
Contact:   Joe.Wegwert@nau.edu

FS 141  The Logo   (James I. Bowie, Sociology and Social Work)
As symbols of identity for organizations, products, people, and places, logos are ubiquitous in our world, and they have become a primary carrier of meaning in our increasingly visually-oriented culture.  This Seminar will examine logos from a variety of perspectives, assessing their significance with regard to commerce, art, marketing, branding, design, and society in general.
Contact:   James.Bowie@nau.edu

FS 141  Music, Nature & Society  (Thomas Sheeley, Music)
Beginning with a reading of C.S. Lewis’ “Abolition of Man,” and utilizing the examples of nature, this Seminar will explore the differences between natural and artificial orders as they exist in music, political philosophy and society.
Contact:  Thomas.Sheeley@nau.edu

FS 141  The Open-Hearted Self  (Heid Wayment, Psychology)
This Seminar introduces students to the social psychological concept of the “self” with a focus on the benefits and obstacles associated with self-evaluation processes such as self-esteem, self-enhancement, and self-protection.  Through course readings, discussions, written papers and essay exams we will explore the inter- and intrapersonal benefits of having a more balanced, centered, and less defended view of the self.
Contact:   Aaron.Divine@nau.edu

FS 141  Religion and Violence  (Megan Castellan, First Year Seminar Program)
There are few things so controversial in the world today as religion and violence.  And yet, few things are so omnipresent.  In this Seminar, we will critically examine the link between the two to explore why some forms of religious expression seem to encourage violence, while others encourage peace.
Throughout the semester, we will critically examine instances of religiously-linked violence through its discourse, like the biblical justifications for slavery and segregation. Similarly, we will examine religiously-linked movements for social change and peace-making as exemplified in the sermons of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  In each case, we will try to determine what separates violent religious expression from a peaceful one.
Contact:   Forthcoming

FS 141  Trafficking of Women & Girls (Chineze Onyejekwe, First Year Seminar Program and Women’s & Gender Studies)
The trafficking of women and girls happens all over the world and yet remains hidden from public view. This Seminar explores the various issues related to the complex phenomenon of human trafficking of women and girls (also referred to as a form of modern day slavery). Case studies will include discussion of the problems of trafficking in women and girls in various countries such as Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern to Western Europe and North America. Relevant topics include the commercial sexual exploitation and trafficking of women and girls for the purpose of prostitution, the role of the internet in the commercialization of sex, transnational marriages such as the mail-order bride industry, trafficking for other slave-like practices, forced labor, the exploitation of immigrant females for domestic services, the US Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA), the U Visa for immigrants who are victims of crime, and the role of the international community in fighting this problem.
Contact:  Chineze.Onyejekwe@nau.edu

FS 141  US Foreign Policy 2012  (Phillipa Winkler, Extended Campuses)
In this Seminar, we examine President Obama’s foreign policy in the Middle East, Africa and Central and South Asia.  We will evaluate President Obama’s strategy in several specific areas:  wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan, Israel and sanctions against Iran, and an increased US military presence around the Horn of Africa. This will be assessed with reference to an emerging hegemony, the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China). Questions we will pose: should the US remain expansionist or become isolationist? What foreign policies can best promote the national security of the US?
Contact:   Phillipa.Winkler@nau.edu

FS 141  Water for 9 Billion  (Cassandra Dakan, Honors)
Water: Life depends on it. Civilizations rise and fall with and without it. Will there be enough, as population grows and climate shifts?  Your future will be shaped by it. Explore this precious resource and innovative solutions to water sustainability.  This Seminar will examine water use, scarcity, supply and demand in Arizona and the arid Southwest, historically and modern day.  After understanding water from a local and regional perspective, students will examine how people are solving water problems – too much, too little – in innovative ways in other parts of the world, and addressing the related realities of population growth and climate change.
Contact:   Cassandra.Dakan@nau.edu