Fall 2011 Courses

FS 111, 121, 131, 141 are 3 unit courses designed for first year students for Liberal Studies distribution block credit.

FS 111 = Science (non-lab)
FS 121 = Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry
FS 131 = Cultural Understanding
FS 141 = Social & Political Worlds

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course with an Action Research Team
These Seminars may require students to work together in Action Research Teams on projects identified in consultation with community partners.

Science (non-lab) Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 111  Early Humans & Environment  (Paul Umhoefer, Geology)
This Seminar will explore the remarkable story of the evolution and migration of Early Humans, which like all animal species were greatly influenced by the physical environments they encountered and the environmental changes they endured.
Contact:  Paul.Umhoefer@nau.edu

FS 111  Global Sustainability  (Stefan Sommer, Biological Sciences)
This Seminar will present our cutting edge understanding of environmental sustainability. Students will learn how sustainability is understood by ecological, social, economic, and engineering experts. We will explore the ways in which people are working to create a more sustainable society.
Contact:   Stefan.Sommer@nau.edu

FS 111  Renewable Energy Applications   Karin Wadsack, First Year Seminar Program)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This Seminar will explore issues in renewable energy technology development and application with a focus on the potential for renewable energy use in the various communities of Arizona. Students will work in groups to research renewable energy technologies, communities or facilities that could make suitable use of renewable energy, and the feasibility of developing renewable energy projects with a variety of communities and institutions. Student groups will present their projects at a series of public symposia, and will have the opportunity to teach about renewable energy in Flagstaff area schools.
Contact:   Karin.Wadsack@nau.edu

FS 111  Sex, Bugs, & Rock-n-Roll  (Richard Hofstetter, Forestry)
This Seminar covers topics relating human society and behavior to insect behavior, ecology, reproduction and social systems. Examples include movies, music, art and history that utilize insects and will relate this to how insects have and do affected humans.
Contact:  Richard.Hofstetter@nau.edu

FS 111  Water in the Southwest  (Angie Moline, Earth Sciences-Environmental Sustainability)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Ecohouse Residential Learning Community

This Seminar uses a systems approach to analyze water allocation, use, and reuse in the Southwest.  It also examines the balance between the water needs of humans and Southwestern ecosystems.  Hands-on practical learning opportunities are a vital component of the course.
Contact:   Angie.Moline@nau.edu

FS 111  Western & Alternative Medicine (Alison Adams, Biological Sciences)
This class will examine Western, Alternative and Native medicine, with an emphasis on examining the evidence for effectiveness of these various forms of treatment.  For example, how well do anti-depressants work, compared with placebos?  How well does acupuncture work, when fake needles are used instead of real needles?  Might crystals, magnets and other types of alternative therapies be useful?   What about Native medicine?  How does a sugar pill or other form of placebo help people feel better?  How should you choose what form of treatment to use?
Contact:   Alison.Adams@nau.edu

FS 111  Yoga: Tradition Meets Science  (Deborah McCormick, Nursing, and Keelyn Riley)
This Seminar invites a deep investigation into the practice of yoga by focusing on the intersection between ancient yoga traditions and current scientific understandings related to the benefits of yoga.  The effects of yoga on anatomy, physiology, and neurobiology will be explored.  Techniques for stress management and self-care are included.  Come join us—your life will never be the same!
Contact:   Debby.McCormick@nau.edu

Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 121  The Arts in the NAU Community  
This Seminar provides opportunities for students to attend, reflect upon, and analyze a variety of cultural events on campus and in the Flagstaff community.
Contact:  Blase.Scarnati@nau.edu

FS 121  Comics: Pow! Bam! Biff!  (Kevin Ketchner, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
The modern comic book will inform the contextual analysis for this Seminar.  We will explore comics from their humble origins in the 1930’s as the reprinted pages of the Sunday newspaper comic strips, to the best selling graphic novels of today. It will be seen that comics and their heroes soak up and reflect their culture and their times.  This encompasses the battles waged against the Axis powers of World War II, the diversity of themes and social consciousness of the 1960’s and 1970’s, the adaption of popular culture titles such as Star Wars, the reformation of the industry with the advent of the graphic novel and comic-based film, to the current industry as the country redefined it’s place in the world post-9/11.
Contact:  Kevin.Ketchner@nau.edu

FS 121 Conflict & the Human Condition  (Everett Akam, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
“Only the dead have seen the end of war.” So wrote Plato in the third century BC. Through films, novels, and other provocative readings, this course explores the reasons why conflict remains a ubiquitous part of the human condition. Along this journey we will also analyze and fashion our own moral philosophy capable of enhancing peace within our community and throughout the world.
Contact:  Everett.Akam@nau.edu

FS 121 Communication & NAU Community  (Emilly Borthwick-Wong, First Year Seminar Program)
Communication is integral to every facet of our society.   Students in this Seminar will attend activities such as guest lectures, athletic events, films and theater performances on the Northern Arizona University’s campus.  You will have the opportunity to explore and analyze how communication helps to create, maintain and challenge share believes.  Students will attend 15 NAU events and then as a class will work to make sense of NAU’s community and analyze how communication helps shape campus culture.
NOTE:  Students enrolled in this course should be prepared to attend an event once a week. The events may take place on weeknights or during the weekend.  Attendance at events outside of class is a mandatory portion of the course.
Contact:  Emilly.Borthwick@nau.edu

FS 121 The Copernican Revolution  (Peter Kosso, Philosophy)
By studying the Copernican Revolution we will encounter interesting and important aspects of cosmology, the scientific method, scientific change, the relation between science and society, and even the methods and limitations of history.  We will clarify what happened and when.  And we will ask when and by what evidence it became reasonable to believe that the earth moves around the sun.
Contact:  Peter.Kosso@nau.edu

FS 121 Ecology of Mind  (Jeffrey Warren Bloom, Education)
From aboriginal cultures to the “big” thinkers of today, “ecology of mind” has been an important perspective on people’s relationships to the Earth, to themselves, and to others. This Seminar focuses on using systems thinking and pattern thinking to explore how we can connect to a deeper sense of being, to others, and to our environments.
Contact:  Jeff.Bloom@nau.edu

FS 121 Fragments and Ruins  (Constance DeVereaux, Comparative Cultural Studies)
How do we create our ideas of self? How do we build meaningful relationships with ourselves and others through aesthetic experience, through frameworks of value developed through traditions of inquiry, and through the conditions of our physical, social, and political world that contribute to the formation of identity? These questions have been posed and explored in a variety of ways throughout history.  In this Seminar, students will examine these perennial issues through the lenses of “fragmentation” and “ruin” as manifested in a wide variety of forms: architecture, literature, philosophy, and visual and performing art. Key to the exploration is the human attraction to the incomplete, the unresolved, the imperfect; in other words, to the fragments and ruins we often encounter which arouse our aesthetic awareness of self and the human condition, as well as a concrete desire to explore the possibilities for transforming the unfinished and unresolved into the complete.
Contact:  Constane.DeVereaux@nau.edu

FS 121 Inquiry Into Sustainability  (Kimberley F. Curtis, First Year Seminar Program and Sustainable Communities)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Increasing numbers of thinkers in the US and across the globe believe that industrial civilization is threatening the earth, and that our way of life cannot be sustained.  They are inspired by the truth that dark periods in human history have often been the most creative periods, requiring new cultural practices and relationships, new public narratives, and new self-understandings.  We will engage some of the leading economic, political, religious-philosophical and educational critics of industrial civilization, examining and assessing together dimensions of the problems as well as the wealth of new thinking and creative practical-political experimentation taking place to address them.
Contact:  Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

FS 121  Is Civil Discourse Dead?  (Rosalinda Haddon, Nursing)
This is a highly interactive Seminar that will trace the history or conversation in the United States from colonial times to present day. How we converse during expansion, wars, peace, colonialization and with technology will be explored. The end product will be a discourse on a controversial topic.
Contact:  Rosalinda.Haddon@nau.edu

FS 121 New Mind Yourself  (Barbara Sheeley, Art)
There’s a mismatch between the high-tech world we’ve created and the ‘old mind’ we inherit as humans. Contemporary culture requires ways of thinking and responding in alignment with the high stakes of the new century.  To ‘new mind yourself,’ students learn about how the mind creates, modifies and recreates experience using an innovative method of examining art as the starting point. Through guided analyses of different forms of creative expression, we develop active thinking skills that enable more clarity and flexibility. We use these skills to spotlight some important trends within society and around our planet and develop written, visual and verbal presentations focused on issues of local, national and global importance.
Contact:  Barbara.Sheeley@nau.edu

FS 121  Noir in Film & Literature  (Bruce Fox, Forestry)
In this Seminar we will discuss the characteristics and import of noir as it reflects societal values and perspectives—or does not—using a variety of scholarly texts and articles, books, and films.  We will use texts from the Brothers Grimm, Mark Twain, and hard-boiled detective novels from the 1940s and 1950s.   Some classicfilm noir  include, but will not be limited to, Chinatown, High Noon, Double Indemnity, Dirty Harry, and I am a Fugitive From aChain gang.
Contact:  Bruce.Fox@nau.edu

FS 121 Power – Justice – Freedom  (Kimberley F. Curtis, First Year Seminar Program and Sustainable Communities)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Power, justice and freedom are some of our most potent political words.  In this Seminar, we will engage some of the most interesting and controversial answers to the questions: What is power? What is justice? What is freedom?  Our readings and our discussions will deepen students’ ability to understand contemporary political struggles and aspirations, and help them develop their own sense of how these questions should best be answered, and what is at stake as they do so.
Contact:  Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

FS 121 Reinventing King Arthur  (John Doherty, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)
C.S. Lewis once compared the Arthurian legend to a great medieval cathedral that was built by many over generations.  In this case, it has been 1,500 years in the making, and still going strong.  Since 1900 literature, film and music have contributed more to the Arthurian story than at any other time since it first emerged as oral tales in the Wales of the 500s.  We will briefly examine the first 1,400 years of the story, and then concentrate on the recent additions of film and fiction, including Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Excalibur, The Mists of Avalon, The Crystal Cave, and the recent BBC TV series Merlin.  We will critically examine how the 20th Century has put its own unique spin on a very popular story.
Contact:  John.Doherty@nau.edu

FS 121 Sci-Fi and Society  (Elaine C. Brown, Philosophy)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This Seminar will read sci-fi for not only what is happening in the story itself, but also for what it reveals about how we, as a society and as individuals, imagine about ourselves and our possible futures.
Contact:  Elaine.Brown@nau.edu

FS 121  Social Justice-Youth Empowerment  (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program and  Gerald Wood, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy through the Public Achievement model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers in one of two elementary schools in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.
Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 121  Social Justice-Youth Empowerment  (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program and Gerald Wood, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy through the Public Achievement model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers in one of two elementary schools in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.
Contact:  Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu

FS 121  Transition Globalization Culture  (Betsy Buford, First Year Seminar Program)
Our world is changing.  As a human race, our traditions, careers, choices, attitudes, and interpersonal relationships are all in a state of transition.  In this Seminar, students will analyze and discuss several different works of fiction and non-fiction in order to explore transitional experiences from a personal to a global level. The Seminar will support students in examining just how these changes affect our understanding of ourselves, our communities, and the world around us.
Contact:  Betsy.Buford@nau.edu

FS 121 Women & Music (Julie Hedges Brown, Music)
This Seminar explores women in the western art music tradition, the societal constraints under which they worked, and how portrayals of females in opera and song reflect socio-cultural thinking about women.
Contact:  Julie.Brown@nau.edu

Cultural Understanding Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 131  Art, Immigration & the Border  (Robert Neustadt, Modern Languages)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
We will explore a 2000-mile line that separates two countries—the U.S. and Mexico—from a multitude of different perspectives and will learn about the history of the border, a topic that of course defines the history of the state of Arizona. After exploring this history, we will examine a wide range of art, literature and performance about the border. Additionally, through documentary film and articles, we will consider the political, economic, social and environmental consequences of “the wall,” US immigration policy and the implications of legislation surrounding the issues (including SB 1070).
NOTE:  There are required field trips off campus.  Please contact the professor for more information. 
Contact:  Robert.Neustadt@nau.edu

FS 131  Gender, Race & the Land  (Arianne Burford, Women’s & Gender Studies)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This Seminar will introduce students to various perspectives regarding the land and the ways that it is honored, exploited, and thought about in relation to and by people.  We will read perspectives that critique the attitude of conquering, destroying, and exploiting the land and how this is tied to racism, white supremacy, and masculinity.  We will study Native American perspectives on the land as well as histories about the destruction of the land and the relationship between these to capitalism and corporate profits.  Assigned reading will include poetry, essays, novels, autobiographical excerpts, and histories about the above issues as well as ways that women have connected to the land as a healing space, and ways that women of diverse ethnicities and sexualities see the land and have survived independent of men on the land.  Part of the class will include analyzing queer poetry and thinking about the way that dominant conceptions of heterosexuality, race, economics, and gender identity in Western culture shape mainstream attitudes about the land and social justice responses and action.
Contact:  Arianne.Burford@nau.edu

FS 131  Native Music, Native Identity (Chad Hamill, Music)
Within Native American communities throughout North America, music is central to the everyday experience and lifeways of Native people. This Seminar will explore the role of music in shaping Native American identities across the broad landscape of Indian Country. In addition to songs that embody long-held traditions, we will encounter Native American identities expressed through contemporary genres such as rock, rap, and reggae.
Contact:  Chad.Hamill@nau.edu

FS 131  Southwest Sustainable Foods  (Patrick Pynes, First Year Seminar Program)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Our field of study will be the historic and contemporary foodways and agricultural traditions of the Southwest’s diverse cultures: Hopi, Navajo, Hispano, European American, Asian American, and many more. Let’s learn about the Southwest’s sustainable foods, from amaranth to zucchini.
NOTE:  There are required field trips off campus.  Please contact the professor for more information.
Contact:  Pat.Pynes@nau.edu

Social & Political Worlds Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 141 Adventure & Wildlands  (Aaron Divine and Pam Foti, Geography, Planning and Recreation)
The purpose of this Seminar is to investigate adventure and the landscape of adventure. The Seminar will begin with an overview of adventure and the people who have ventured out on the edge and then will move into the areas where adventure occurs with an emphasis on the United States. The Seminar will include a variety of educational activities: lecture, discussion, classroom activities, and required field experiences.
NOTE:  There are required field trips off campus.  Please contact the professor for more information.
Contact:   Aaron.Divine@nau.edu

FS 141  Democracy as a Way of Life  (Kelly Campbell Rawlings, Politics & International Affairs)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This Seminar begins with a critical examination of the various ideals, institutions, and practices of democracy and civil society in the US context.  The Seminar then examines the idea of “democracy as a way of life” and explores the ways in which our actions and interactions in one area of our lives impact and influence other areas (e.g. home, school, and workplace).  The Seminar will also focus on multiple locations for democratic participation and exposing students to a wide variety of opportunities for civic engagement.
Contact:  Kelly.Rawlins@nau.edu

FS 141  Democracy, Social Justice & the Environment (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program, and Rom Coles, Community, Culture, and Environment)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
In this Seminar, grassroots democratic participation is explored in relation to problems of environmental sustainability, social justice, and diversity from the local level to the global.  We will examine systemic aspects of social and environmental problems as well as alternative pathways for change.  Community-based research and engagement are a vital component of the course, facilitating a process in which students can participate in fostering the changes that they want to see in the world.
Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 141  Ethics for a Global Economy (Paul Baker, First Year Seminar Program)
As a global economy continues to develop, ethical and cultural issues that affect the international business arena, have become of increasing importance.  This Seminar specifically addresses the following ethical issues: employment practices, consumer protection, environmental issues, bribery, sexual harassment, office theft, basic human rights and fundamental freedoms.  Case study analysis, videos, and guest speakers will provide the student with an increased understanding and sensitivity to these issues.
Contact:   Paul.Baker@nau.edu

FS 141  The Great Immigration Debate  (Leah Mundell, First Year Seminar Program)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Why has the issue of immigration inflamed the passions of so many across the political spectrum in recent years? In this Seminar, we will explore the history of U.S. immigration policy, the politics of immigration reform, and the cultural implications of immigration in the United States. Students will also have the opportunity to act on the issues discussed in the course by participating in an Immigration Action Research Team in collaboration with local community organizations. Students will choose specific research and action topics and develop strategies for communicating their research to a wide variety of audiences.
Contact:   Leah.Mundell@nau.edu

FS 141  Healthcare-Right or Privilege?  (Lanny Morrison, First Year Seminar Program)
This Seminar will allow students to explore how policy is formulated and implemented to address healthcare issues.  Students will learn how healthcare policy, like the Affordable Care Act (often referred to as Obamacare), is made at the state or national level and what it takes to implement it. Historical examples will be considered for what has and has not worked including unintended consequences of well-intentioned efforts. Students will learn how they, or any other citizen, can act to influence policy.
Contact:  Lanny.Morrison@nau.edu

FS 141  Indigenous Environmental Justice (Karen Jarratt Snider, Applied Indigenous Studies)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This Seminar examines the indigenous environmental justice movement at the twenty-year anniversary of the First People of Color Summit on Environmental Justice in 1991.  Students will learn about the history of the movement, environmental justice law and policy created following the summit, and examine specific cases of indigenous environmental justice.  Students will also explore current issues of environmental injustice facing Indigenous communities in the United States, Australia, Canada, various parts of South America, Africa and other parts of the globe.  Topics explored will include the effects of mining, hazardous waste, climate change, protection of sacred lands, water, intellectual property rights and the use of traditional ecological knowledge, and protection of traditional homelands.
Contact:   Karen.Snider@nau.edu

FS 141  LGBTQ: Identities & Meanings  (Joseph Wegwert, Education)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
This Seminar invites students to join together in investigation, discussion, and action as informed by the historical, cultural, and political limitations and possibilities of questions of sexual orientation, gender identities, and gender expression. We will examine the cultural, religious, ideological, and historical underpinnings of the normalization processes and dynamics of gender expression and sexual orientation and will investigate the roles of media, families, and social, cultural, and political institutions as they shape and regulate the meanings of gender, gender performance, and sexual identity. Importantly, this Seminar will also provide opportunities to interrogate and act on the meanings and possibilities of equality and social justice for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning people in American society and throughout the world.
Contact:  Joe.Wegwert@nau.edu

FS 141 The Logo  (James I. Bowie, Sociology and Social Work)
As symbols of identity for organizations, products, people, and places, logos are ubiquitous in our world, and they have become a primary carrier of meaning in our increasingly visually-oriented culture.  This Seminar will examine logos from a variety of perspectives, assessing their significance with regard to commerce, art, marketing, branding, design, and society in general.
Contact:  James.Bowie@nau.edu

FS 141  Men/Women: Gender in America  (Andrew Schrack Walters, Psychology)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Surveying theory and research concerning the construction and enactment of gender in contemporary society, this Seminar will focus on influences of culture, socialization, and individual differences on women and men.
Contact:  Andy.Walters@nau.edu

FS 141  Music, Nature & Society (Thomas Sheeley, Music)
Beginning with a reading of C.S. Lewis’ “Abolition of Man,” and utilizing the examples of nature, this Seminar will explore the differences between natural and artificial orders as they exist in music, political philosophy and society.
Contact:  Thomas.Sheeley@nau.edu

FS 141  Searching for Justice (Cyndi Banks, Criminology & Criminal Justice)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
The purpose of this Seminar is to raise student awareness about the foundations and nature of justice through the lens of human rights and of human rights issues.  Exploring the historical, philosophical, cultural and legal implications of universal human rights reveals how these rights have become entrenched in international law and why they are widely supported locally and globally.
Contact:  Cyndi.Banks@nau.edu

FS 141  Student Democratic Initiatives (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program, and Rom Coles, Community, Culture, and Environment)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Have your voices heard.  Learn about community.  Deepen your understanding of citizenship, public work, and a living democracy.   Learn theory that will be directly applicable to hands on organizing. Students in this course will identify campus and community concerns and use grassroots democratic organizing strategies to take action.   Students will focus on the model of Public Achievement as they learn the essential steps in becoming civic agents of change.  This Seminar is a celebration of power, voice, and engagement.  NAU students will gain an in depth perspective of civic society both historically and in our present environment
Contact:  Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu

FS 141  Student Democratic Initiatives (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program, and Rom Coles, Community, Culture, and Environment)
CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
Have your voices heard.  Learn about community.  Deepen your understanding of citizenship, public work, and a living democracy.   Learn theory that will be directly applicable to hands on organizing. Students in this course will identify campus and community concerns and use grassroots democratic organizing strategies to take action.   Students will focus on the model of Public Achievement as they learn the essential steps in becoming civic agents of change.  This Seminar is a celebration of power, voice, and engagement.  NAU students will gain an in depth perspective of civic society both historically and in our present environment
Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

FS 141 Women & Society  (Chineze Onyejekwe, First Year Seminar Program and Women’s & Gender Studies)
This Seminar analyzes the subordinate position of women in society as being socially constructed. It will also explore the interdependency between gender and power, and how the understanding of gendered social constructions can help in addressing gender inequalities and promote gender equity.
Contact:  Chineze.Onyejekwe@nau.edu