Spring 2014 courses

FS 111, 121, 131, 141 are 3 unit courses designed for first year students for Liberal Studies distribution block credit.

FS 111 = Science (non-lab)
FS 121 = Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry
FS 131 = Cultural Understanding
FS 141 = Social & Political Worlds

For online course descriptions, see class in LOUIE or go to http://home.nau.edu/FYSeminar/   

International NOTE: This is an online or blended class. International students are limited by U. S. regulations as to how many online units may count toward full-time enrollment. Some international students are limited as to how many online and blended units are eligible for financial funding.

ARTS Note:  This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

To enroll in a First Year Seminar, log in to your NAU LOUIE account.

 

Science (non-lab) Liberal Studies distribution block

FS 111 Earthquakes and Society (David Brumbaugh)

 What would you do when the ground begins to shake? Would you just be another victim or would you know what to do to save your life? f you live in a place like Port Au Prince, Haiti, or even southern California it could happen at any time, without warning. This class will teach you what to do, or even how to avoid such a fate. Learn about earthquakes in this Seminar, the what, when, where, why and what has been done to protect life and property. Go on a journey of self-discovery to the very center of the Earth as you ride along with a speeding earthquake wave to the very core of our planet.

Course fee required.

Contact:David.Brumbaugh@nau.edu


FYS 111 Dinosaurs Past, Present, Future (David Gillette)

Dinosaurs dominated the Earth in the Mesozoic Era, but became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 million years ago. Their reign began with small, nimble predators that eventually led to some of the most bizarre animals ever to live on land, and the largest, some as large as 20 elephants.  This Seminar course explores the science of dinosaur paleontology, the importance of dinosaurs in education, and their place in the modern world.   Subject material includes geologic time, dinosaur classification, anatomy, ecology, distribution, evolution, education, exhibits, and pop culture.

Course fee required.

Contact: David.Gillette@nau.edu

 

FS 111 Grand Canyon Seminar(Angie Moline, Earth Sci & Env Sust Lecturer)

This Seminar focuses on the ecosystems and management systems in Grand Canyon National Park.  Students will learn about the major ecological zones (e.g., pine forest, shrub land, desert, river) in the park and understand the underlying ecological processes.  Students will also examine how Grand Canyon National Park balances the visitor experience with the protection these ecosystems, which benefit native plant and animal species.   
 
This course will feature two one-day field trips (Jan. 28, Mar. 6) and a three-day overnight camping/research trip (Apr. 4-6 or 3-5) to Grand Canyon National Park. Institutional excuses will be provided for all field trips.

Course fee required.

Contact: Angie.Moline@nau.edu

 

 

Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 121 The Politics of Dr. Seuss (Lela Montfort, University College)

To what extent do books such as Horton Hears a Who!,The Lorax, or The Sneetches influence thoughts and beliefs?  This Seminar will explore the intersections between creative expression and our political world.  We will use books by Dr. Seuss along with research and discussion about topics such as sustainability, discrimination, and advocacy to explore how these works reflect various political values and perspectives.  Students will further develop their capacities for analysis, critical thinking, and ethical reasoning through class participation and effective writing.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact Lela.Montfort@nau.edu


FYS 121 In the Business of Change (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar)

In an ever changing world we often wonder how we can make a living and follow our passions.  This course will address topics of how to make money and change the world.  Business has the potential to create lasting and meaningful change in the world.  This course will utilize guest speakers from the community, graduate students, and professors in the college of business to give students a full view of how to successfully take their ideas, learn about the community, and create successful businesses.  In the course you will work with your classmates on business plans that could turn into the next big thing!

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu  

 

FYS 121   Animal Performers and Performance (Season Ellison, Theater)

The human animal relationship with non-human animals is incredibly complex and oftentimes contradictory. As Hal Herzog’s title to his newest non-fiction book illustrates: “Some We Love, Some We Hate,” and “Some We Eat.” In this course, we will use film and television viewings, fiction literature, philosophical lectures and treatises, and our own experiences to interrogate our human relationships with non-human animals. We will look at filmed animal performers and consider the ethics of employing animals for entertainment purposes; (2) We will examine how animals perform in their daily lives and consider what the concept of “performance” can teach us about our animal-human experiences; (3) We will examine the ethics and performance components of using animals for training, sport, research, and the food industry; and, (4) We will consider how we human-animals might perform non-human animals to garner a better understanding of varies species both different from and similar to, us.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Season.Ellison@nau.edu


FYS 121  Animal Performers and Performance   (Season Ellison, Honors & First Year Seminar)

What is evident within popular films and novels such as “Marley and Me” and “Water for Elephants,” to American classics such as “Mr. Ed” and “Lassie,” to live performances found at the circus, zoo, or “Cirque du Soliel,” is that our human relationship to non-human animals is incredibly complex. In this Seminar we will use performance (literally and metaphorically) as a way to contemplate this relationship. This Seminar will consist of four primary sections: (1) We will look at live and filmed animal performers and consider the ethics of employing animals for entertainment purposes; (2) We will examine how animals perform in their daily lives and consider what the concept of “performance” can teach us about our animal-human experiences; (3) We will examine the ethics and performance components of animal training, and; (4) We will consider how human-animals perform the non-human animal.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Season.Ellison@nau.edu

 

FYS 121   Comics: Pow! Bam! Biff!   (Kevin Ketchner, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)

This course will explore comics as a reflection of society from their humble origins in the 1930’s to the best-selling graphic novels of today through their visual representation and interpretation of our changing social, political and national identity. This course emphasizes in class participation and students will need to demonstrate the essential skill of critical thinking as demonstrated through effective writing and class discussion off a variety of topics based upon contextual analyses of the comic book medium including graphic novels, manga, film and supporting materials.

Course fee required.

Contact:   Kevin.Ketchner@nau.edu

 

FYS 121   Social Justice – Youth Empowerment   (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program)

Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy through the Public Achievement model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers in one of two elementary schools in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester. 

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

 

FYS 121   Social Justice-Youth Empowerment   (Lauren Berutich, First Year Seminar Program)

Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy, public work, and citizenship through the Public Achievement (PA) model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers at Kinsey Elementary School in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Student concerns addressed during the after school program will lead to issue identification and grassroots democracy participation.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.  Students will engage in hands-on learning through field work and leadership development.  They will not only develop crucial critical thinking and leadership skills while gaining a deeper understanding of who they are in the world, but will have the opportunity to pass this knowledge down to the next generation of thinkers, doers, and civic agents of change.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu  


FYS 121, 121H Tolkien and Lord of the Rings (Rosalinda Haddon, Director of Liberal Studies, University College)

This Seminar focuses on the works of J.R.R. Tolkien and how his culture and beliefs influenced his writings and teachings. We will examine how he and others define myth, truth and the characteristics of heroes. We will focus on how myth can be truth and truth can be myth and explore the symbolism and meaning behind the characters and events in the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. We will also explore the need for heroes in Tolkien’s time and for us today.

The texts and other media will serve as the foundation for class conversation and all written assignments. Learning approaches will include class conversation, individual and group activities and written assignments.

Course fee required.

Contact: Rosalinda.Haddon@nau.edu 


FYS 121 Food for Thought (Rosemary Logan, First Year Seminar)

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course with an Action Research Team

These Seminars will require students to work together in Action Research Teams on projects identified in consultation with community partners.  

Are you concerned about the future of our planet? Do you ever feel helpless, or wonder if you can make a difference? This class will assist you in discovering your own passions and interests while giving you the tools to make a difference in your community. Through the lens of food we will investigate issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Learn about where your food comes from, who has it/who doesn’t and why, and how to grow food in Flagstaff. All theory from this course will be applied in action through campus-based Action Research Teams (ARTS) and Students for Sustainable Living and Urban Gardens (SSLUG).  

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Rosemary.Logan@nau.edu


FYS 121 Living the Good Life (Rosemary Logan, First Year Seminar)

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course with an Action Research Team
These Seminars will require students to work together in Action Research Teams on projects identified in consultation with community partners.  

Do you ever wonder, if you—just one person—is capable of making a difference in this world? You are not alone. This class will assist you in discovering your own passions and interests while giving you the tools to work with others and make a difference in your community. Through the lens of sustainable living we will investigate issues of environmental and social justice. Learning units will focus on food, energy, and water; how these issues affect our local community, and how we can affect change through personal and social engagement. All theory from this course will be applied in action through weekly Action Research Team (ARTS) engagement inside and outside of class.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Rosemary.Logan@nau.edu


FYS 121 Leading Yourself (Dr. Craig Van Slyke, Dean of W.A. Franke Business of College)

How many courses impact every aspect of your life? If you put the work in, this one will. Taught by Dr. Craig Van Slyke, Dean of the W.A. Franke College of Business, “Leading Yourself” puts you on the path of living a purposeful, mindful, successful life (however you might define success). During the course you will learn and apply cognitive and behavioral strategies for directing yourself. You will also begin to develop the “why” of your life, which you can use to guide important decisions. You will also gain and apply skills that are transferable to all leadership situations. The course is delivered using active, learner-centered principles. (In other words, you’ll do more than just listen to lectures.) Be forewarned, this is not a touchy-feely kind of course. The course is a pragmatic look at the core tools you can use to live life well.

Course fee required.

Contact Craig.VanSlyke@nau.edu


FYS 121 Civility, Reason, Engagement (Andrea Houchard, Philosophy)

We all recognize that our society has become increasingly fractured and politicized, with less space than ever for reasoned and deliberative debate. The most recent Arizona Town Hall proceedings on Civic Engagement found that Arizonans held a deep desire to increase civic engagement (described as participation in the life of one’s community in order to improve it and shape its future) and foster a sense of connection within communities, as well as a respect for human dignity and diversity of opinion. A majority of Arizonans in a recent survey were deeply unhappy about the nature of the state’s civic health. Similarly, Arizona ranked very low in terms of civic health, as measured by such things as voter turnout and participation in other civic activities. 

In light of these findings, the purpose of this class is to build deliberative skills and give students opportunities to engage in deliberative democracy. Students will do this with each other in the classroom, and in the general public. We will spend the semester discussing “hot topics”.  These topics have been identified by stakeholders in the NAU and Flagstaff communities as important concerns that warrant reasoned discussion.  We will concurrently discuss topics in the class that are discussed in university and community forums.  Students will attend community forums as observers. In the class, students will serve as facilitators.  By the end of the class, students will have the opportunity to facilitate their own “hot topic”.  To this end, the class has three broad purposes.

  1. To understand civility, deliberative democracy and civic engagement.
  2. To give students an opportunity to engage in civil discussions with members of the community.
  3. To develop students’ research and analysis abilities to critically and impartially evaluate political issues.

The types of issues we may discuss include topics such as taxes and the federal debt, the cost of higher education, climate change, health care access and coverage, and global citizenship in an age of globalization. 

Course fee required

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Andrea.Houchard@nau.edu

 

FS 121  Noir in Film & Literature   (Bruce Fox, Forestry)

In this Seminar we will discuss the characteristics and import of noir as it reflects societal values and perspectives—or does not—using a variety of scholarly texts and articles, books, and films.  We will use texts from the Brothers Grimm, Mark Twain, and hard-boiled detective novels from the 1940s and 1950s.   Some classic film noir include, but will not be limited to, Chinatown, High Noon, Double Indemnity, Dirty Harry, and I am a Fugitive From aChain Gang.

Course fee required.

Contact:  Bruce.Fox@nau.edu

 

FS 121, FS 121H King Arthur in Legend and Literature   (John Doherty, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)

C.S. Lewis once compared the Arthurian legend to a great medieval cathedral that was built by many over generations.  In this case, it has been 1,500 years in the making, and still going strong.  Since 1900 literature, film and music have contributed more to the Arthurian story than at any other time since it first emerged as oral tales in the Wales of the 500s.  We will briefly examine the first 1,400 years of the story, and then concentrate on the recent additions of film and fiction, including Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Excalibur, The Mists of Avalon, The Crystal Cave, and the recent BBC TV series Merlin.  We will critically examine how the 20th Century has put its own unique spin on a very popular story.

Course fee required.

Contact:   John.Doherty@nau.edu

 

FS 121  Art Making & Place Shaping (Nora Timmerman)

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course with an Action Research Team

These Seminars will require students to work together in Action Research Teams on projects identified in consultation with community partners

Who doesn't want justice in the world?  In this Seminar, we think through what justice looks like from an ecological and artistic perspective: what is eco-justice, why it is important, and how can we try to create it artistically?  In addition to thinking about these concepts, students actually get to put them to work in practice with a local community artist or group.  This is a course with an Action Research Team (ART), where students can expect to be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners in the facilitation or creation of public art for environmental restoration, conservation, or education. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community to make meaningful social change; each student is required to volunteer an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to our Seminar's ART.

Course fee required.

Contact:  Nora.Timmerman@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Nature: A Gated Community? (Michael Caulkins, First Year Seminar)

In his recent national bestseller, Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv makes the case that there is a “staggering divide between children and the outdoors” that he links to the current rise of childhood obesity, ADHD, and anxiety and depression among youth in America. Here in Flagstaff, we are surrounded by ‘nature’ that might predictably help local youth avoid some of the problems Louv discusses. However, Flagstaff is also a linguistically, culturally, and economically diverse city, meaning not all youth have the same access to the physical, emotional and social benefits of a deeper connection to nature. This hands-on and place-based First Year Seminar will explore issues in race, class, culture and environment, particularly as it pertains to place and student-community empowerment. Students in this Seminar will investigate the philosophical and practical issues related to youth access to outdoor learning centers, local outdoor camps, and environmental education generally through field trips, site visits, and community research projects. Be prepared to investigate and explore our focus areas both in Seminar and the outdoors.

Please note that all theory from this course will be applied in action through campus-based Action Research Teams (ARTs). ARTs are student-led groups that allow for civic engagement and participation in the wider university and community. Each student is required to volunteer with our ART for an average of three hours per week (or 36 hours per semester) outside of class. Both day and overnight field trips away from NAU campus are required for enrolled students.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Michael.Caulkins@nau.edu

 

FS 121  Magic and Ritual (Jennifer Hunter)

Using examples from multiple cultures, religions, and time periods, this Seminar will explore the ways in which societies, religions, and individuals have utilized rituals and magic to create, maintain, and order the human experience of existence. Students will be exposed to different kinds of rituals including the mundane rituals of everyday life, domestic and magical rituals, the structured rituals of various religions, and even ‘scientific’ rituals with the goal of understanding the role that rituals and magic play in transforming both the individual self and the larger society, in ordering our daily lives and the larger world around us, and in developing and maintaining both familial and societal relationships.

Course fee required.

Contact:  Jennifer.Hunter@nau.edu

 

FS 121  Immigrants & Aliens on Film (Ricardo Guthrie)

How do representations of “Alien Others” in Sci-Fi films, fiction and popular culture evoke political discourses of race, nationality and immigration in the United States? Sci-Fi Aliens—similar to alien immigrants—are often seen as either threatening monsters or helpful laborers who “invade” the U.S. and create anxiety.  Using films and literature examining political, economic, and social beliefs of the late-Twentieth century, Seminar participants will assess the impact of popular discourses about race and immigration. 

According to Berg: Sci-fi films may fulfill an important mythic-cultural function by providing a cinematic arena for the unconscious reflection on the immigrant question, social justice, and national identity.”  The course provides interdisciplinary perspectives on race, identity, and their social, political and historical impact on American society.  In this context, films and cinematic experience will be critically examined as mechanisms which influence public conception of and exposure to these issues.  Students are required to participate in the course (both in-class and online) by reading textbooks and articles, viewing and analyzing films, completing short assignments, and a term project.

Course fee required.

Contact:  Ricardo.Guthrie@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 New Mind Yourself   (Barbara Sheeley, First Year Seminar Program and Art)

There’s a mismatch between the high-tech world we’ve created and the ‘old mind’ we inherit as humans. Contemporary culture requires ways of thinking and responding in alignment with the high stakes of the new century.  To ‘new mind yourself,’ students learn about how the mind creates, modifies and recreates experience using an innovative method of examining art as the starting point. Through guided analyses of different forms of creative expression, we develop active thinking skills that enable more clarity and flexibility. We use these skills to spotlight some important trends within society and around our planet and develop written, visual and verbal presentations focused on issues of local, national and global importance. 

Course fee required

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:   Barbara.Sheeley@nau.edu


FYS 121 – Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Sacha Siskonan, Civic Engagement Institute)

Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Sacha.Siskonen@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 – Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Michelle James, First Year Seminar)

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course with an Action Research Team
These Seminars will require students to work together in Action Research Teams on projects identified in consultation with community partners.

Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Michelle.James@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Making a World of Difference (Karen van der Veer, First Year Seminar)

How do you define your purpose and identify your passion? What inspires you to make a difference? What can you do now to change the world?  Can you really make a living based on generosity and compassion? This Seminar is designed to transform our dialogue about positive change into a plan of action.  Exploring the source of our passion and inspiration, we can more clearly define success and meaningful change.  By developing a personal narrative in the form of a business plan or life plan, we can create a framework for our ambition and set a trajectory to change the world.  Digging deep to find true sources of motivation, we can build a powerful foundation for substantial and meaningful change--creating careers and purposeful paths of enormous success and impact.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Karen.Venderveer@nau.edu

 

Culture Understanding Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 131 Sex, Power, Politics (Naomi Pinion, First Year Seminar )

This exciting new Seminar explores sexuality through a multi-cultural perspective.  Throughout the semester we will look at cultural influences that help to shape our world views on sex, power and politics.  The course will address the politics of sexuality through topics and issues including bodies, norms and values, race, ethnicity and gender, families, sexual orientation, LGBTQ (gay) rights, art, and religion.  The readings are a nice balance of scholarly work and popular sources including personal narratives that breathe life into the theories we will be discussing in class.  Course structure is a lively mixture of class and small discussion, films, great readings and some lecture time, group work and informal presentations.  SEX, POWER & POLITICS is designed not only to foster academic achievement, but personal growth and the joy of learning!

Course fee required.

Contact: Naomi.Pinion@nau.edu

 

 

 

Social & Political Worlds Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 141   Trafficking of Women & Girls (Chineze Onyejekwe, First Year Seminar Program and Women’s & Gender Studies) 

Two sections are offered.

The trafficking of women and girls happens all over the world and yet remains hidden from public viewThis Seminar explores the various issues related to the complex phenomenon of human trafficking of women and girls (also referred to as a form of modern day slavery). Case studies will include discussion of the problems of trafficking in women and girls in various countries such as Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern to Western Europe and North America. Relevant topics include the commercial sexual exploitation and trafficking of women and girls for the purpose of prostitution, the role of the internet in the commercialization of sex, transnational marriages such as the mail-order bride industry, trafficking for other slave-like practices, forced labor, the exploitation of immigrant females for domestic services, the US Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA), the U Visa for immigrants who are victims of crime, and the role of the international community in fighting this problem.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our websitehttp://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Chineze.Onyejekwe@nau.edu

 

FS 141  The Logo   (James I. Bowie, Sociology and Social Work)

As symbols of identity for organizations, products, people, and places, logos are ubiquitous in our world, and they have become a primary carrier of meaning in our increasingly visually-oriented culture.  This Seminar will examine logos from a variety of perspectives, assessing their significance with regard to commerce, art, marketing, branding, design, and society in general.

Course fee required.

Contact:   James.Bowie@nau.edu

 

FS 141 Activism & Migrant Justice (Leah Mundell)

Today’s activists fighting for immigrant justice are part of a long tradition of organizing for the rights of migrants in the United States and around the world. What are the lessons we can learn from global immigrant activist struggles? How do their strategies and tactics reveal particular conceptions of power linked to different political environments and popular understandings of immigrants? Who are the heroes of these movements, those we know such as Cesar Chavez and those who remain hidden? In this Seminar, we will explore the answers to these questions not only through reading of history and politics but also through interviews with local immigrant leaders. We will take a field trip to the migrant farm worker community of Yuma and take action on the issues raised in the class through participation in the Immigration Action Research Team.

Course fee required.

Contact: Leah.Mundell@nau.edu  

 

FS 141 Technology, Mind and Brain (Dr. Michelle Miller Co-Director, First Year Learning Initiative, University College, Professor, Department of Psychology)

The 20th century was a time of radical technological change, and the 21st century likely will be too.  Computers, smart phones, instant messaging and Internet surround us, drastically altering how we interact with information and with each other.  What are the impacts of these technologies on human psychology – including interpersonal relationships, mental processes, even the brain itself?  Using what we know from the science of psychology, can we leverage these technologies to promote human well being?  In this Seminar, we will tackle both of these questions, first, through critical reading and analysis of work drawn from the psychological research literature and from popular media, and second, through designing psychologically-based applications to promote well-being. 

Course fee required.

Contact:  Michelle.Miller@nau.edu

 

FYS 141  LGBTQ: Identities and Meaning (Joseph Wegwert, Teaching and Learning) 

This Seminar invites students to join together in investigation, discussion, and action as informed by the historical, cultural, and political limitations and possibilities of questions of sexual orientation, gender identities, and gender expression. We will examine the cultural, religious, ideological, and historical underpinnings of the normalization processes and dynamics of gender expression and sexual orientation and will investigate the roles of media, families, and social, cultural, and political institutions as they shape and regulate the meanings of gender, gender performance, and sexual identity. Importantly, this Seminar will also provide opportunities to interrogate and act on the meanings and possibilities of equality and social justice for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning people in American society and throughout the world.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:   Joe.Wegwert@nau.edu