Fall 2014 courses

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR (FYS)

FYS 111, 121, 131, 141 are 3 unit courses designed for first year students for Liberal Studies distribution block credit.

FYS 111 = Science (non-lab)
FYS 121 = Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry
FYS 131 = Cultural Understanding
FYS 141 = Social & Political Worlds

SECOND YEAR SEMINAR (SYS) - NEW!  

SYS 211, 221, 231, 241 are 3 unit courses designed for second year students for Liberal Studies distribution block credit.

SYS 211 = Science & Sustainable Systems (non-lab)
SYS 221 = Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry
SYS 231 = Issues in Diversity
SYS 241 = Topics in Civic & Global Engagement

(SYS course offerings for Fall 2014 TBA)

CRAFTS / Community Engagement Initiative course
These Seminars may require students to work together on projects identified in consultation with community partners.

ARTs / Action Research Team course
Students will be out of the classroom collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change.

For online course descriptions, see class in LOUIE.  

International NOTE: This is an online or blended class. International students are limited by U. S. regulations as to how many online units may count toward full-time enrollment. Some international students are limited as to how many online and blended units are eligible for financial funding.

ARTS Note:  This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and to view a video clip on the ARTs, visit our website

To enroll in a First Year Seminar, log in to your NAU LOUIE account.

First Year Seminar

Science (non-lab) Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 111   Global Sustainability   (Stefan Sommer, Biological Sciences)

This Seminar will present our cutting edge understanding of environmental sustainability. Students will learn how sustainability is understood by ecological, social, economic, and engineering experts. We will explore the ways in which people are working to create a more sustainable society.

Course fee required.

Contact:   Stefan.Sommer@nau.edu

 

FYS 111 Dinosaurs Past, Present, Future (David Gillette)

Dinosaurs dominated the Earth in the Mesozoic Era, but became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 million years ago. Their reign began with small, nimble predators that eventually led to some of the most bizarre animals ever to live on land, and the largest, some as large as 20 elephants.  This Seminar course explores the science of dinosaur paleontology, the importance of dinosaurs in education, and their place in the modern world.   Subject material includes geologic time, dinosaur classification, anatomy, ecology, distribution, evolution, education, exhibits, and pop culture.

Course fee required.

Contact: David.Gillette@nau.edu

 

FYS 111 Ecology & Behavior of Bats (Carol Chambers, School of Foresty)

This course will cover the ecology of bats around the world, emphasizing adaptations that make bats so unique, such as flight and echolocation. We will focus on some of the 28 bat species in Arizona and include field trips and projects to see and learn more about bats and their habitat. By studying this group of animals, students will gain a wider understanding of the role adaptations play in animal use of the environment and processes that shape the natural world. You’ll never be afraid of the dark again.

Course fee required.

Contact: Carol.Chambers@nau.edu

 

Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 121 New Mind Yourself   (Barbara Sheeley, First Year Seminar Program and Art)

There’s a mismatch between the high-tech world we’ve created and the ‘old mind’ we inherit as humans. Contemporary culture requires ways of thinking and responding in alignment with the high stakes of the new century.  To ‘new mind yourself,’ students learn about how the mind creates, modifies and recreates experience using an innovative method of examining art as the starting point. Through guided analyses of different forms of creative expression, we develop active thinking skills that enable more clarity and flexibility. We use these skills to spotlight some important trends within society and around our planet and develop written, visual and verbal presentations focused on issues of local, national and global importance. Course fee required

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Course fee required.

Contact:   Barbara.Sheeley@nau.edu


FYS 121   Comics: Pow! Bam! Biff!   (Kevin Ketchner, First Year Seminar Program and Honors)

This course will explore comics as a reflection of society from their humble origins in the 1930’s to the best-selling graphic novels of today through their visual representation and interpretation of our changing social, political and national identity. This course emphasizes in class participation and students will need to demonstrate the essential skill of critical thinking as demonstrated through effective writing and class discussion off a variety of topics based upon contextual analyses of the comic book medium including graphic novels, manga, film and supporting materials.

Course fee required.

Contact:   Kevin.Ketchner@nau.edu


FYS 121 Making a World of Difference (Karen van der Veer, First Year Seminar)

We all have the capacity to change the world. Our commitment and motivation to do so may vary or be unclarified, yet within us all is a desire for a better world and a yearning to help create one.  By empathetically tuning in to the needs of the planet and its humanity as resources for inspiration, we simultaneously access our passion and see opportunities to create change.

In this course we will investigate relevant local and global issues of concern and focus our attention to the development of innovative solutions. Through class interaction, personal introspection, spontaneous and  reflective writing, we will explore the various aspects of what it takes to create a life of substantial and meaningful contribution-- from creating careers and purposeful paths of success and impact to sparking a revolution. 

This course is designed to transform our dialogue about positive change into a plan of action as we engage our skills and passions in a community project.  In addition, we will use our personal and classroom explorations to create a ‘life plan’ that empowers us as we aspire to make a world of difference.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Karen.vanderVeer@nau.edu


FYS 121 Veteran Transition Resilience (Andrew Griffin, WA Franke College of Business)

A First Year Seminar course in the Liberal Studies Aesthetic & Humanistic Inquiry distribution block. The course will be comprised of a student veteran cohort of up to 23 students.  In Supporting the Transitional Resilience of the Student Veteran  we will compare and contrast the military cultural in American society, define the key concepts of transitional resilience, and  follow with the exploration and examination of challenges and best practices towards academic and career development success of the newly transitioning student veteran into NAU.    The course will be presented as part of a customized College-based (non-residency) Learning Community (CBLC) and also include a community service project for first-year student veterans on the Flagstaff campus.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Andrew.Griffin@nau.edu


FYS 121   Social Justice – Youth Empowerment   (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar Program)

Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy through the Public Achievement model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers in one of two elementary schools in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester. 

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu


FYS 121   Social Justice-Youth Empowerment   (Mara Pfeffer, First Year Seminar Program)

Young people have the opportunity to shape the world around them.  This Seminar will serve as a space for inquiry development, teaching methods, and a gained understanding of democracy, public work, and citizenship through the Public Achievement (PA) model.  NAU students will serve as coaches and teachers at Kinsey Elementary School in Flagstaff to highlight the voices of their students through a community based project.  Student concerns addressed during the after school program will lead to issue identification and grassroots democracy participation.  Core concepts such as power, community, engagement, and grassroots organizing will be practiced and discussed throughout the semester.  Students will engage in hands-on learning through field work and leadership development.  They will not only develop crucial critical thinking and leadership skills while gaining a deeper understanding of who they are in the world, but will have the opportunity to pass this knowledge down to the next generation of thinkers, doers, and civic agents of change.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: mp787@nau.edu


FYS 121- Environment & Social Change (Michelle Thomas, First Year Seminar Program)

Want to learn about the environment through the exploration of social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives?  Ready to have your voices heard and share in dialogue around issues that matter to YOU and the PLANET?  This course will explore community through a very new lens, one that connects living and non-living worlds and addresses how having the right tools to organize can bring about real, on-the-ground positive community change.  How do you feel about renewable energy use on NAU campus, drug and alcohol use, student government sponsored activities, recycling and compost initiatives, LGBT equity issues, sustainable food systems, immigration and civil rights in Arizona, college tuition fees, campus transportation issues, student accountability and waste, accessibility to campus and community services? Deepen your understanding of citizenship and democracy by practicing it, and by becoming participants and agents of civic change on campus, in Flagstaff, and in your communities at large.  This course is hands-on and exploratory and will ask the students to think through an experiential, learning lens.  The students will have the opportunity to discover the surrounding Flagstaff community and its diverse landscapes on and off campus to establish various areas of interest and identify issues they would like to address and CHANGE.  You have a voice and it can be heard!

Sign up today for a fun, engaging, and truly meaningful exploration of community through ecological, environmental and social change.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Michelle.Thomas@nau.edu


FYS 121 – Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Sacha Siskonan, Civic Engagement Institute)

Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Sacha.Siskonen@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Just Food (Kimberley Curtis, First Year Seminar)

Deepen and broaden your understanding of what a just food system might look like – for workers, for animals, for the health of the soil and the earth’s climate.  Through readings, films, field trips and interviews we will explore “just” and “unjust food”.  Our focus this semester will be on problems at the intersection of immigration and food system workers (in the fields and slaughterhouses), animal rights, and climate impacts of our carbon-intensive food system.  Simultaneously, we will study and interview farmers, ranchers and justice activists on the cutting edge of “just food”.    

Make your learning matter by working together to help educate the young and transform the food system toward community scale “just food” in Flagstaff in your Action Research Team.

Course fee required. 

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

 

FYS 121   Animal Performers and Performance (Season Ellison, Theater)

The human animal relationship with non-human animals is incredibly complex and oftentimes contradictory. As Hal Herzog’s title to his newest non-fiction book illustrates: “Some We Love, Some We Hate,” and “Some We Eat.” In this course, we will use film and television viewings, fiction literature, philosophical lectures and treatises, and our own experiences to interrogate our human relationships with non-human animals. We will look at filmed animal performers and consider the ethics of employing animals for entertainment purposes; (2) We will examine how animals perform in their daily lives and consider what the concept of “performance” can teach us about our animal-human experiences; (3) We will examine the ethics and performance components of using animals for training, sport, research, and the food industry; and, (4) We will consider how we human-animals might perform non-human animals to garner a better understanding of varies species both different from and similar to, us.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Season.Ellison@nau.edu

 

FYS 121  Animal Performers and Performance   (Season Ellison, Honors & First Year Seminar)

What is evident within popular films and novels such as “Marley and Me” and “Water for Elephants,” to American classics such as “Mr. Ed” and “Lassie,” to live performances found at the circus, zoo, or “Cirque du Soliel,” is that our human relationship to non-human animals is incredibly complex. In this Seminar we will use performance (literally and metaphorically) as a way to contemplate this relationship. This Seminar will consist of four primary sections: (1) We will look at live and filmed animal performers and consider the ethics of employing animals for entertainment purposes; (2) We will examine how animals perform in their daily lives and consider what the concept of “performance” can teach us about our animal-human experiences; (3) We will examine the ethics and performance components of animal training, and; (4) We will consider how human-animals perform the non-human animal.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Season.Ellison@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Student Driven Campus Change (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar)

Ever wanted to change something for the better?  This course will empower and prepare students to work effectively in their communities, social groups and democracy to initiate and achieve social change.  Students will learn and discuss topics such as, what makes a good citizen, activism, service and politics, and ways to become leaders in their community. This course will focus on how people organize to create and exercise power to make change. It will also focus on increasing our own toolbox of skills to lead and create movements. We will work to change the culture of engagement on campus and on projects of our choosing. 

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 The Politics of Dr. Seuss (Lela Montfort, University College)

To what extent do books such as Horton Hears a Who!,The Lorax, or The Sneetches influence thoughts and beliefs?  This Seminar will explore the intersections between creative expression and our political world.  We will use books by Dr. Seuss along with research and discussion about topics such as sustainability, discrimination, and advocacy to explore how these works reflect various political values and perspectives.  Students will further develop their capacities for analysis, critical thinking, and ethical reasoning through class participation and effective writing.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact Lela.Montfort@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Living the Good Life (Rosemary Logan, First Year Seminar)

Do you ever wonder, if you—just one person—is capable of making a difference in this world? You are not alone. This class will assist you in discovering your own passions and interests while giving you the tools to work with others and make a difference in your community. Through the lens of sustainable living we will investigate issues of environmental and social justice. Learning units will focus on food, energy, and water; how these issues affect our local community, and how we can affect change through personal and social engagement. All theory from this course will be applied in action through weekly Action Research Team (ARTS) engagement inside and outside of class.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Rosemary.Logan@nau.edu

 

FYS 121, 121H Tolkien and Lord of the Rings (Rosalinda Haddon, Director of Liberal Studies, University College)

This Seminar focuses on the works of J.R.R. Tolkien and how his culture and beliefs influenced his writings and teachings. We will examine how he and others define myth, truth and the characteristics of heroes. We will focus on how myth can be truth and truth can be myth and explore the symbolism and meaning behind the characters and events in the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. We will also explore the need for heroes in Tolkien’s time and for us today.

The texts and other media will serve as the foundation for class conversation and all written assignments. Learning approaches will include class conversation, individual and group activities and written assignments.

Course fee required.

Contact: Rosalinda.Haddon@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Food for Thought (Rosemary Logan, First Year Seminar)

Two sections are offered.

Are you concerned about the future of our planet? Do you ever feel helpless, or wonder if you can make a difference? This class will assist you in discovering your own passions and interests while giving you the tools to make a difference in your community. Through the lens of food we will investigate issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Learn about where your food comes from, who has it/who doesn’t and why, and how to grow food in Flagstaff. All theory from this course will be applied in action through campus-based Action Research Teams (ARTS) and Students for Sustainable Living and Urban Gardens (SSLUG).  

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Rosemary.Logan@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Civility, Reason, Engagement (Instructor TBA)

We all recognize that our society has become increasingly fractured and politicized, with less space than ever for reasoned and deliberative debate. The most recent Arizona Town Hall proceedings on Civic Engagement found that Arizonans held a deep desire to increase civic engagement (described as participation in the life of one’s community in order to improve it and shape its future) and foster a sense of connection within communities, as well as a respect for human dignity and diversity of opinion. A majority of Arizonans in a recent survey were deeply unhappy about the nature of the state’s civic health. Similarly, Arizona ranked very low in terms of civic health, as measured by such things as voter turnout and participation in other civic activities. 

In light of these findings, the purpose of this class is to build deliberative skills and give students opportunities to engage in deliberative democracy. Students will do this with each other in the classroom, and in the general public. We will spend the semester discussing “hot topics”.  These topics have been identified by stakeholders in the NAU and Flagstaff communities as important concerns that warrant reasoned discussion.  We will concurrently discuss topics in the class that are discussed in university and community forums.  Students will attend community forums as observers. In the class, students will serve as facilitators.  By the end of the class, students will have the opportunity to facilitate their own “hot topic”.  To this end, the class has three broad purposes.

  1. To understand civility, deliberative democracy and civic engagement.
  2. To give students an opportunity to engage in civil discussions with members of the community.
  3. To develop students’ research and analysis abilities to critically and impartially evaluate political issues.

The types of issues we may discuss include topics such as taxes and the federal debt, the cost of higher education, climate change, health care access and coverage, and global citizenship in an age of globalization. 

Course fee required

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  TBD

 

FYS 121 Leading Yourself (Dr. Craig Van Slyke, Dean of W.A. Franke Business of College)

How many courses impact every aspect of your life? If you put the work in, this one will. Taught by Dr. Craig Van Slyke, Dean of the W.A. Franke College of Business, “Leading Yourself” puts you on the path of living a purposeful, mindful, successful life (however you might define success). During the course you will learn and apply cognitive and behavioral strategies for directing yourself. You will also begin to develop the “why” of your life, which you can use to guide important decisions. You will also gain and apply skills that are transferable to all leadership situations. The course is delivered using active, learner-centered principles. (In other words, you’ll do more than just listen to lectures.) Be forewarned, this is not a touchy-feely kind of course. The course is a pragmatic look at the core tools you can use to live life well.

Course fee required.

Contact: Craig.VanSlyke@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Animal Rights/Holistic Justice (Mara Pfeffer, First Year Seminar)

Want to learn more about animal rights, vegetarianism, or veganism? Always wondered if there was more to these movements than what you see on TV? Interested in learning about creative and holistic social movements that promote the wellbeing of both humans and nonhuman animals? In this Seminar, we will explore the connections between human and animal oppression, discussing how the matrix of sexism, racism, classism, ableism, homophobia, and speciesism operates in our world. From this foundation, we will explore the sustainability and ethics of animal use in agriculture, entertainment, fashion, and science and examine the arguments and the tensions within the animal liberation movement. Students in this course will have opportunities to gain hands on experience in veganic gardening, creating public art, planning their own actions promoting the wellbeing of animals, and collaborating with other community groups through participation in the NAU Total Liberation Action Research Team. Through this hands-on experience, students will explore the question: As we work to create a sustainable planet, what does it really look like to remember human-animal connections within our own communities?

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: mp787@nau.edu

 

FYS 121- Environment & Social Change (Michelle Thomas, First Year Seminar Program)

Want to learn about the environment through the exploration of social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives?  Ready to have your voices heard and share in dialogue around issues that matter to YOU and the PLANET?  This course will explore community through a very new lens, one that connects living and non-living worlds and addresses how having the right tools to organize can bring about real, on-the-ground positive community change.  How do you feel about renewable energy use on NAU campus, drug and alcohol use, student government sponsored activities, recycling and compost initiatives, LGBT equity issues, sustainable food systems, immigration and civil rights in Arizona, college tuition fees, campus transportation issues, student accountability and waste, accessibility to campus and community services? Deepen your understanding of citizenship and democracy by practicing it, and by becoming participants and agents of civic change on campus, in Flagstaff, and in your communities at large.  This course is hands-on and exploratory and will ask the students to think through an experiential, learning lens.  The students will have the opportunity to discover the surrounding Flagstaff community and its diverse landscapes on and off campus to establish various areas of interest and identify issues they would like to address and CHANGE.  You have a voice and it can be heard!

Sign up today for a fun, engaging, and truly meaningful exploration of community through ecological, environmental and social change.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Michelle.Thomas@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 How To Think Like Da Vinci (Grace Kendall, University College)

Humans have an almost unlimited potential for learning and creativity. This Seminar will engage students in developing the means to accomplishing more than they ever thought possible by following the example of one of the greatest geniuses of all time—Leonardo da Vinci. You will learn about and apply six da Vincian Principles to uncover your abilities, sharpen your senses and awaken your intelligence. In the process, you will develop insights about the world and ways to make a unique contribution to it.

Course fee required.

This is an online or blended class.  International students are limited by U.S. regulations as to how many online units may count toward full-time enrollment.  Some international students are limited as to how many online and blended units are eligible for financial funding.

Contact: Grace.Kendall@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 In the Business of Change (Kevin Ordean, First Year Seminar)

In an ever changing world we often wonder how we can make a living and follow our passions.  This course will address topics of how to make money and change the world.  Business has the potential to create lasting and meaningful change in the world.  This course will utilize guest speakers from the community, graduate students, and professors in the college of business to give students a full view of how to successfully take their ideas, learn about the community, and create successful businesses.  In the course you will work with your classmates on business plans that could turn into the next big thing!

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Kevin.Ordean@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Nature: A Gated Community? (Michael Caulkins, First Year Seminar)

In his recent national bestseller, Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv makes the case that there is a “staggering divide between children and the outdoors,” which he links to the rise of childhood obesity, ADHD, and anxiety and depression among youth in America. Here in Flagstaff, we are surrounded by ‘nature’ that might predictably help local youth avoid some of the problems Louv discusses. However, Flagstaff is also a linguistically, culturally, and economically diverse city, which may impact youth access to nature…and to the physical, emotional and social benefits of a deeper connection to natural places. Beyond this, cultivating an environmental ethic in young people, regardless of culture, first language, race, or economic class is important if we wish to avoid some of the significant ecological problems the world is currently facing.

This experiential and place-based First Year Seminar will explore issues of culture, class, morality and environment, particularly as these pertain to youth and families having understandings of and access to nature. In this Seminar we will use several field trips, site visits, and community research projects to investigate the philosophical and practical issues of nature, nature access, and moral understandings of nature. This is a hands-on, community-based course that will have students doing projects in, through and for the youth and families of Flagstaff. Be prepared to investigate our focus areas both in Seminar and in the outdoors. Please note that both day and overnight field trips away from NAU campus are required, as well as weekend and evening events associated with the Action Research Team (ARTs) component of the course.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Michael.Caulkins@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 – Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Sacha Siskonan, Civic Engagement Institute)

Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Sacha.Siskonen@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Slam Poetry, Art, and Activism (Michelle James, First Year Seminar)

Art, poetry, and music have the amazing potential to energize, engage, and shape the world we live in.  These artistic mediums have a long history of being critical in large social justice and environmental organizing efforts.  This Seminar will provide a narrative history and give students a chance to develop their own skills of artistic impression as a way to spark social movements and find their own voice.  This Seminar will have a community engagement component that will require students to be involved in local open mic, slam poetry, concerts, and live art events in the Flagstaff community outside of class time.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Michelle.James@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Social Media Nexus (Kevin Ordean, First Year Seminar)

What do Occupy Wall Street, Arab Spring, Coca Cola, and you all have in common? Social media is a part of what you do and how things are done. How can the same tool be used to help topple regimes as is used to sell products, help relatives or friends catch up, or keep up with the latest news? This Seminar explores the diverse power of social media and how the tools and campaigns are able to leverage it to accomplish amazing things. Businesses, activists, students, and more all have this tool at their hands.

The question the course hopes to answer is this: How can social media be used to help change the world? Students will research the impact these tools have had and use those lessons to design an outreach campaign aimed at addressing a challenge (environmental, social, political).  Smartphones and Laptops recommended, though not necessary. 

Course fee required. 

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester for the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website.

Contact: Kevin.Ordean@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Understanding Risk (Peter Friederici, School of Communication)

Why do people seek out activities that can harm or kill? How do communities or entire societies balance risk and reward? Why are human beings so good at sensing and dealing with risk in the short term, but so bad at it in the long run? Based on new research from fields as diverse as psychology and climate science, this highly interdisciplinary Seminar will examine how individuals and societies understand risk and incorporate it into their lives. We will look at how gender roles influence the perception of risk, how cultures control risk through initiation rites and other activities, how societies deal with disasters before or after they strike, and how societal efforts to control risk through insurance and regulation may sometimes backfire. We will use films and readings to examine how to better understand a complex, multifaceted issue that touches everyone.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Peter.Friederici@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Seeds of Change (Kimberley Curtis, First Year Seminar)

Would you like to live in a world where communities grow much of their own food in highly productive small scale sustainable gardens and farms, where energy is used wisely and comes from renewable sources, and where power and respect depend not on the amount of money you have but on your ability to creatively work with others to co-create the world?  Who wouldn’t?  But how do we get there?  How can we become powerful participants in the transition to a more sustainable and more just world?  What do we need to know?  And how do we begin to act? Explore these questions by studying how some of the most visionary social critics answer them, and by formulating your own powerful answers by becoming “seeds of change” as you participate with students and community members in fun and life-changing social action projects such as greening the schools and localizing the food system.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Kimberley.Curtis@nau.edu

 

FYS 121  Climate Justice & Native Lands  (Berkley Carnine)

Drowning polar bears, forced relocations, extreme weather, depleted aquifers, and disease—it’s easy to stop reading the news, but now more than ever, we need to engage. In this seminar, students will explore various frameworks for understanding climate change and climate justice: scientific debate, human rights, resource extraction, and class, race, and gender (in)equality. Indigenous perspectives on the environment and self-determination will be foregrounded. As part of Action Research Teams, students will develop hands-on group projects connected to regional climate justice and Indigenous-led movements. Through supporting local organizing efforts, students will learn to apply their knowledge of root causes of climate crisis and strategies for change. Drawing on examples of regeneration, resistance, and resiliency, this seminar aims to grow students into local actors and global advocates for the health and survival of our communities and planet.
Course fee required.
This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester with the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

 

FYS121  The ART of Community Change (Elisabeth Sims, Civic Service Institute)

Students will actively participate in the Flagstaff PAWS public art project while deeply exploring the impacts the project has had/ will have on the community at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. 

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Elisabeth.Sims@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Community, Philanthropy & Events (Rand Jenkins, First Year Seminar)

What makes a community thrive? How can we address challenges that threaten a community’s sustainability and health through special events, fundraisers, concerts and festivals? What type of events support and help to reunite communities, grow awareness, and instill pride in the town that we live in? This Seminar will focus on community development, health, and sustainability through the engagement and active participation of its members as they collectively gather in diverse and creative ways.  Students will explore why communities have begun to become fragmented and disconnected. They will discuss how citizens of small towns and large are seen as distanced from their local politicians, small business owners, local municipalities and even their neighbors. We will explore what programs have worked and what programs have not in order to engage our community through events that promote philanthropy and the arts. Students will define their individual social and civic responsibilities and how this sense of community will help tackle local issues like education, crime, poverty, and political divisiveness.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester with the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: FYSeminar@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Ecology of Mind (Jeffrey Warren Bloom, Education)

From aboriginal cultures to the “big” thinkers of today, “ecology of mind” has been an important perspective on people’s relationships to the Earth, to themselves, and to others. This Seminar focuses on using systems thinking and pattern thinking to explore how we can connect to a deeper sense of being, to others, and to our environments. As we proceed with our explorations, we will find interconnections across various disciplines (e.g., the arts, sciences, humanities, etc.) and contexts (e.g., cultures and everyday experiences). Through a variety of inquiries students will examine a number of key aspects of such thinking, including: (a) relationships between objects and concepts of various kinds; (b) feedback loops and other non-linear cycles of information and/or materials flow; (c) transformation and change; (d) patterns that extend across and characterize different disciplines; (e) patterns of organization; (f) coordination; (g) continuity; (h) separation and unification; (i) regulation; (j) epistemology or how we see the world; (k) double binds; (l) ecology of mind and nature); and (m) aesthetics and beauty. In examining various objects and phenomena, students will engage and develop skills in the basic aspects of systems thinking and pattern thinking, which include taking multiple perspectives, developing models and explanations, inviting a diversity of ideas, analyzing functions, analyzing meanings, and evaluating the applicability of explanations across contexts. Student work will focus on group and individual inquiries and the development of a major project in an area of individual interest.

Course fee required.

Contact:   Jeff.Bloom@nau.edu

 

FYS 121 Theater for Social Justice (JeanAnn Foley, Education)

Theater is a medium that can challenge the status quo and the dominant ways of seeing. Theater  can push the boundaries of typical response and expose the raw strength and fragility of the human condition. This course will examine contemporary and historical plays and film that have challenged the status quo.  Using these plays and characters as models, students will locate political or social issues within our community  that are meaningful to them and bring an enlightened perspective through dramatic performance.

Course fee required.

Contact: JeanAnn.Foley@nau.edu

 

 

 

Culture Understanding Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 131 Sex, Power, Politics (Naomi Pinion, First Year Seminar )

This exciting new Seminar explores sexuality through a multi-cultural perspective.  Throughout the semester we will look at cultural influences that help to shape our world views on sex, power and politics.  The course will address the politics of sexuality through topics and issues including bodies, norms and values, race, ethnicity and gender, families, sexual orientation, LGBTQ (gay) rights, art, and religion.  The readings are a nice balance of scholarly work and popular sources including personal narratives that breathe life into the theories we will be discussing in class.  Course structure is a lively mixture of class and small discussion, films, great readings and some lecture time, group work and informal presentations.  SEX, POWER & POLITICS is designed not only to foster academic achievement, but personal growth and the joy of learning!

Course fee required.

Contact: Naomi.Pinion@nau.edu

 

 

 

Social & Political Worlds Liberal Studies distribution block

FYS 141 Indigenous Human Rights (Jamie Daisy Purdy, Ethnic Studies)

This Seminar will turn from the commercial Indians of John Wayne and Johnny Depp and address real issues impacting Indian Country today.  Ever wondered about the connection between economic development and NDN cars?  The politics of basketball?  Religious freedom and sewage?  Students will explore their personal identity and public perceptions utilizing various mediums from Facebook to film.  By the close of the course, students will be able to support the compelling argument that Natives are people too.  You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll promote positive change.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Jamie.Purdy@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 Trash Talk: Waste in our World (Nora Timmerman, Sustainable Communities)

You threw away about 4.4 pounds of garbage yesterday, and over the course of a year, your personal garbage will weigh 1,600 pounds. United States citizens threw away so much aluminum last year that if we gathered it all together, we could duplicate the entire US commercial airline fleet! And, in the 60 seconds that it has taken you to read this far in the course description, one million plastic bags were used worldwide. What can we do about all the waste in our world? In this Seminar, we will explore what major challenges exist today in regard to waste, strategies for how to approach those challenges (beyond recycling), and we will engage in a project to make a difference here in the Flagstaff community. 

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Nora.Timmerman@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 Investigating Human Rights (Cyndi Banks, University College)

This is a Liberal Studies course in the Social & Political Worlds distribution block and will address the goal of applying appropriate perspectives to analyze a significant human problem.  This course is a first year seminar that explores the applications of human rights theory and action research to issues globally and locally.  The purpose of this course is to raise awareness about the applications of human rights and of human rights issues through the lens of active research approaches.  Investigating Human Rights will examine issues such as poverty, intimate violence, punishment, education, and immigration from global and local perspectives.  Building on an understanding of universal human rights theory and practice, the course will take an active research approach.  During the semester students will partner with the Immigration Action Research Team (ART) to apply their knowledge of human rights to human rights issues reflected in the local context. Throughout the semester emphasis will be placed on critical thinking through the essential skills of effective writing and effective oral communication. The course is interactive and will follow a participatory model.  You are expected to actively engage in analytical discussions that will depend on prior preparation of the assigned readings.  You will also participate in an action research team that will work with a community partner on a contemporary human rights issue.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: Cyndi.Banks@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 Campus Food Systems (Allison Baker, Sustainable Communities)

Do you think about the food you eat?  How about access and affordability? The local food movement has been gaining popularity over the last three decades and is projected to continue to surge into the 21st century. This Seminar explores food systems with a main focus on the Northern Arizona University Flagstaff Campus dining facilities as well as the two campus gardens. Are you interested in where your food comes from? Do you want to learn how to grow an on campus food system? In this Seminar, we will investigate food systems, climate change research and implications, through civic engagement and grassroots organizing practices.  This Seminar investigates the current and imagines the possible. The possible become reality through the hands on actions and engagements of the students in this class.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact: ab567@nau.edu

 

FYS 141  LGBTQ: Identities and Meaning (Joseph Wegwert, Teaching and Learning)
This Seminar invites students to join together in investigation, discussion, and action as informed by the historical, cultural, and political limitations and possibilities of questions of sexual orientation, gender identities, and gender expression. We will examine the cultural, religious, ideological, and historical underpinnings of the normalization processes and dynamics of gender expression and sexual orientation and will investigate the roles of media, families, and social, cultural, and political institutions as they shape and regulate the meanings of gender, gender performance, and sexual identity. Importantly, this Seminar will also provide opportunities to interrogate and act on the meanings and possibilities of equality and social justice for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning people in American society and throughout the world.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:   Joe.Wegwert@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 Music, Nature & Society (Thomas Sheeley, School of Music)

Beginning with a reading of C.S. Lewis' "Abolition of Man," and utilizing the examples of nature, this Seminar will explore the differences between natural and artificial orders as they exist in music, political philosophy and society.

Course fee required.

Contact:  Thomas.Sheeley@nau.edu


FYS 141 Adventure & Wildlands (Jacob Dolence, First Year Seminar)

The purpose of this Seminar is to investigate adventure and the landscape of adventure. The Seminar will begin with an overview of adventure and the people who have ventured out on the edge and then will move into the areas where adventure occurs with an emphasis on the United States. The Seminar will include a variety of educational activities: lecture, discussion, classroom activities, and required field experiences.
NOTE:  There are required field trips off campus.  Please contact the professor for more information. 

Course fee required.

Contact:   Jacob.Dolence@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 Wars, Massacres, and Genocide (Alex Alvarez)

Wars, massacres, and genocide are the most destructive forms of collective violence in the modern era. The twentieth century, for example, is known as the age of total war. During that same time period genocide alone killed more people than all the international wars, civil wars, revolutions, and guerrilla wars combined. If the Darfur region of the Sudan and the Congo are any indication, then this next century looks to be following the same destructive path. These types of violence impact nations and individuals all around the world, including the U.S., in many direct and indirect ways. The purpose of this course is to critically examine what we know about the nature,  patterns, and characteristics of these closely connected forms of collective violence.

Course fee required.  Two sections are available.

Contact: Alex.Alvarez@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 School Violence and Bullying

Violence is a problem that continues to plague our homes, communities, and our schools. Traditionally, we have cherished the notion that our schools were largely immune to the violence that is such a prevalent part of our society. We believed that our children were safe in their schools. In recent years, however, we have come to recognize that our schools are not as safe as we thought and that sometimes they can be very dangerous for the emotional and physical health of our children. The focus of this course is on exploring the nature and patterns of school violence from bullying to other forms of aggression including mass murder.

Course fee required.

Contact: TBA

 

FYS 141   Trafficking of Women & Girls (Chineze Onyejekwe, First Year Seminar Program and Women’s & Gender Studies) Two sections are offered.

The trafficking of women and girls happens all over the world and yet remains hidden from public view. This Seminar explores the various issues related to the complex phenomenon of human trafficking of women and girls (also referred to as a form of modern day slavery). Case studies will include discussion of the problems of trafficking in women and girls in various countries such as Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern to Western Europe and North America. Relevant topics include the commercial sexual exploitation and trafficking of women and girls for the purpose of prostitution, the role of the internet in the commercialization of sex, transnational marriages such as the mail-order bride industry, trafficking for other slave-like practices, forced labor, the exploitation of immigrant females for domestic services, the US Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA), the U Visa for immigrants who are victims of crime, and the role of the international community in fighting this problem.

Course fee required.

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. For more information and a clip on the ARTs visit our website. http://www2.nau.edu/crafts-p/wordpress/

Contact:  Chineze.Onyejekwe@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 Somebody’s Watching Me  (Jessica R. Barnes, Geography, Planning and Recreations)

From your mother, to your future employers, to the NSA, people are watching you through social media, public space, and your own mobile phone. This Seminar explores surveillance and safety in contemporary society. We will examine and critique how new technologies and societal norms are creating massive amounts of personal data that can show where you’ve been, who you’ve talked to, and what you’ve purchased. We will analyze how public and private spaces utilize surveillance to try to increase safety. Who has access to your information and what can they do with it? How does surveillance by governments, corporations, and peers affect people’s behaviors? Does surveillance make people safer or erode individual freedoms?

Course fee required.

Contact:  Jessica.Barnes@nau.edu

 

FYS 141 IAccess (Christopher Lanterman)

In this interactive Seminar, students will help create more accessible NAU and Flagstaff communities through field trips, discussions, and hands-on projects that will make a difference for individuals with disabilities. 

A substantial foundation for this class is rooted in the concept of universal design, which is “...an orientation to any design process that starts with a responsibility to the experience of the user.” (Institute for Human Centered Design, 2008). Universal design has applications in product, building, recreational, instructional, and other domains. 

Course fee required.

Contact:  Chris.Lanterman@nau.edu

 

 

FYS 141 Social & Political Worlds First Year Seminar  (Instructor TBD)

In this interactive Seminar, students will help create more accessible NAU and Flagstaff communities through field trips, discussions, and hands-on projects that will make a difference for individuals with disabilities. 

A substantial foundation for this class is rooted in the concept of universal design, which is “...an orientation to any design process that starts with a responsibility to the experience of the user.” (Institute for Human Centered Design, 2008). Universal design has applications in product, building, recreational, instructional, and other domains.  

Course fee required.

Contact:  TBD 

 


Second Year Seminar

Topics in Civic & Global Engagement

SYS 241  Reenchantment & Sustainability (Lauren Berutich)

What does community mean to you?  How have you been involved? How would you discuss the relationship among the aspects of culture, community, and environment of your place?  Where are you seeing the celebration of/need for revitalization and reenchantment of these places?  This seminar will explore humans in communities and how/why we make the choices we make, and then, how/why this affects the social, economic, political, and cultural conditions of those communities.  Just, sustainable community development is not a new concept.  We will discuss the challenges and progress of this movement since the early 50’s and attempt together to decide appropriate steps for positive change in this direction now in the 21st century.  Are we there yet?  This seminar will take a local, global, and back to local path as students explore current issues challenging today’s society, how this is a world problem, and ways we can act now in our own communities to create the changes we wish to see. If you are ready for an engaging, hands-on, co-creation of storytelling, community webbing, and civic participation, this seminar is waiting for you.

Course fee required.

This course counts towards your liberal studies requirements and the Civic Engagement Minor. 

This course has an Action Research Team (ART) component where students will be out of the classroom, collaborating with community partners, and engaged in meaningful social change. ARTs are student-led groups that connect you to the wider Flagstaff community; each student volunteers an average of 3 hours per week outside of class each semester to the course ART. 

Contact:  Lauren.Berutich@nau.edu