I2S Available Internships

Only students who meet the following criteria are eligible to apply for an I2S internship:

  • Enrolled full-time and in good academic standing at the Flagstaff Mountain campus at the time of application and at the commencement of an internship
  • Admitted as a degree-seeking student pursuing a first bachelor's degree
  • Successfully completed one full-time semester at NAU
  • Completed less than 75 semester hours (including transfer credits) when the internship begins.
  • International students: Check with your international adviser in CIE to determine your eligibility for employment at NAU

Applications will be accepted beginning August 1, 2015, for Fall 2015 I2S opportunities using the online application form link below. 

Application deadline: September 11, 2015

APPLICANTS: Consult the I2S Student Information and Student FAQ pages for application advice and more information about the program. 

This document lists the required information on the application form. Please review this and prepare your responses and attachments PRIOR to accessing the application form.

NOTE: To log into the application form, your NAU password must NOT have special characters such as these (?, period, [, {, }, ], |). If your password has one or more of these characters, you will need to first change your password in the NAU system.

Online application form You should receive an email with your application responses.

You may apply for up to 3 internships during this application period. However, each internship will require a completing a SEPARATE application form. When you have completed and submitted your first application, you may log in again and complete the next one.  A word of advice: Be sure to tailor each application to the specific activities and expectations described for that position.

All communications or questions regarding these I2S internships, including the responsibilities, requirements, timeline, applications, and selection processes, should be directed to the Undergraduate Research Coordinator.

Fall 2015 Internships 

The Internship ID number is shown to the left of the title (e.g., F15.001, F15.013)

F15:001: Forest History of a Site in Northern Minnesota: The Plant Macro-Fossil Record

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
One of the ways that scientists can learn about past environments is to literally "dig" into the past.  Paleo-ecologists - those scientists that are interested in the history of forests of the past - can take sediment cores from lakes, whose sediments have accumulated over long periods of time, and look at the fossil plant remains that have been deposited in the lake muds.  We are presently studying the lake sediment record from a small pond in northern Minnesota that will tell us about the history of the forests there since the ice occupied the region during the last ice age, perhaps 13,000 years ago or more.  The I2S intern will be part of a research team with the task of sieving lake sediments to concentrate plant macro-fossils to be identified by team members.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
Our long-term records of forests composition, and even of forest fires, are obtained from analysis of small subsamples of sediment cores extracted from lakes. The intern will take small subsamples of sediment from Bugbee Pond, sieve the sediments to extract the plant remains including charcoal particles that have been washed into the lake.  If time allows, the student will assist in tallying the plant remains and may assist in charcoal analysis to statistically determine the frequency of fires at the site in the past. This project will involve no fieldwork, but instead a considerable amount of lab work with sieving the sediments, working with the plant remains, and manipulating the data. The intern will learn lab techniques and the use of a database program, as well as do some data interpretation.

Other benefits to the student: 
In addition to the above, the intern will be part of a research team, producing an important and integral piece of research. S/he will be exposed to research on the cutting edge of our field, considering that at the present time we know little about the history of the forests in this location. S/he will be required to discuss the results with other members of the team, learning what it is like to work with different individuals with different knowledge to benefit the whole - the way of Environmental Sciences.

Additional qualifications:
The intern should have an interest in botany, and an interest in geology is also helpful.

 Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

 Faculty mentor: Scott Anderson, SESES – Environmental and Quaternary Studies

F15:002: Employment Law Case Study

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The student will assist the faculty member with research related to employment law. At this point, there are two potential projects: same-sex marriage and religious freedom based on this summer’s Supreme Court decision OR work on an employment and copyright case that was recently decided by the 9th Circuit Court.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will review the literature based on the legal issues in one of these cases: 1) same sex marriage and freedom of religion, OR 2) copyright law and employment/work for hire.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will have an opportunity to draft sections of the research paper.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
Some background in business law (completion of ACC 205) would be helpful

Faculty mentor: Eric Yordy, Business Law

F15:003: Wearable Teaching - Apple Watch as Learning Tool

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
What we would look at is how can we use wearable technologies, like the Apple Watch, to help students think about and reflect about how they learn. There are years of research that help us understand what an engaged student is and what they look like. But one of the challenges you have is how do you capture those types of activities. The goal of the project would be to develop something that is very simple and easy to interact with, to think about reflectively how it is that you’re learning. We’re looking at the Apple Watch as a reflective tool to capture how the students are interacting with their classmates, how they’re learning and using that to self-inform the student in a number of different ways and what they are doing with their time throughout the day.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The purpose would be for the student to work with designers to develop, implement, and test an Apple Watch app to reflectively measure learning and activities throughout the day. S/he will learn interactive design principles, user testing, and app development.

Other benefits to the student:
The student would learn valuable collaborative approaches and team experience. Interaction Design is the art of effectively creating interesting and compelling experiences for others. No current knowledge of Interaction Design or Interface Design is necessary but a general understanding of communications, media, and the interactive media industry is encouraged. Since everyone has experience with experiences the student should already be amply qualified to learn more about applying what they implicitly understand to the problems of creating "interactive media." The student will learn ways to apply these principles to their present discipline and current work.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
To make this project successful we would need someone with programming skills and app development for the iPhone and Apple Watch. Familiarity with XCode and ObjectiveC for Cocoa a must. While this project should be stimulating and fun, its content--as well as its interaction--will be serious and valuable.

Faculty mentor: Christopher Johnson, School of Communication 

F15:004: Arcosanti Marketing Research Survey Content Analysis

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
As part of an ongoing research project data has already been collected from an Arcosanti Marketing Research Survey. The survey was conducted as exploratory research regarding perceptions of Arcosanti. The sample size is small (<20). Arcosanti has been the focus of a case study as part of a larger research agenda on Culturally Sustainable Entrepreneurship.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student intern will be specifically responsible for analyzing the previously collected data. The student will learn how to use content analysis in quantitative research. The student will perform content analysis including developing a coding scheme and summarize the information for use in a future journal article.

Other benefits to the student:

Develop an understanding of Arcosanti and the opportunities tourism can afford the organization.

Time commitment:  3 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
Interest in tourism and marketing.

Faculty mentor:  Kris Swanson, School of Communication

F15:005: Suicide and Hope: Development of Messages to Prevent Suicide using Hope Theory
Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Researchers have been interested in how to design suicide prevention messages without using the term "suicide." Hope Theory by Snyder (2002) might provide a viable strategy for accomplishing this by focusing on goals, pathways to achieve goals and the motivation to pursue those goals. This project will involve having an intern help gather literature on suicide prevention, hope theory and the application of hope theory to suicide prevention research. The intern will help design messages that could potentially be used for a suicide prevention media campaign. Testing of the messages through surveys will be conducted. The intern will be an active participant in the research process.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will help gather research, design messages, and develop and conduct survey research. The intern will be highly involved in the research process.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will learn about the literature, learn how to be an organized and thoughtful researcher.

Time commitment:  3 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
The intern should have had a research methods course.

Additional comments that are relevant:
It is important for interns to be acknowledged for their contributions. I am willing to submit the research to an academic conference so the intern can have this Intern-to-Scholar experience on his or her resume AND a conference presentation.

Faculty mentor: Laura Umphrey, School of Communication
F15:006: Investigating Difference: Human and Cultural Relations in Criminal Justice

Description of the project that the student intern will support: 

This project is a revision to the textbook Investigating Difference: Human and Cultural Relations in Criminal Justice. This is the third edition of this text which is utilized at NAU in the CCJ 345W junior-level writing course (Investigating Difference). The book is a collection of chapters authored by faculty members in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Department, as well as other members of the broader NAU community. The third edition of this text seeks to update information provided in the second edition as well as construct new chapters regarding important issues of justice.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will DO: For this project, the intern will help with updating statistical data within chapters including census data and other relevant data on crime and victimization. The student will also collect relevant geographical data about NAU (size, student body composition, etc.), the state of Arizona, and national data. The intern will additionally assist authors in online research including current crime and justice system statistics, legal and policy issues, and case study information as well as bibliographic and other reference work. Lastly, the intern will help with support for the editors in the form of creation of discussion questions, PowerPoint presentations, and other support materials for instructors using the text. The student will LEARN: Learning how to do online and other research is an essential tool for students wishing to continue their education into graduate programs. The intern for the project will learn valuable skills about editing a book including working with various authors and working with publishers. Additionally, the intern will learn skills related to crafting a literature review on various topics. Finally, the intern learn and/or hone valuable employable skills such as time management, editing, and other important skills which will aid in employment in justice related fields.

Other benefits to the student:
Since there are deadlines associated with the book project, the student will benefit by developing time management skills, professional writing and editing skills, and critical thinking and analysis skills required in evaluating materials across multiple chapters and topics in the text.

Time commitment:  5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
The selected intern will have good attention to detail and will have effective writing and editing skills. An interest in crime, justice, and issues of diversity is not required, but would be helpful

Faculty mentor: Sarah Prior & Lynn Jones, Criminology & Criminal Justice

F15:007: Prime Time Portrayals of Crime and Justice: Understanding the Impacts on Viewers and Criminal Justice Professionals

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The research will involve work revising a survey instrument, learning about using Survey Monkey, and early phases of analysis.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will first become familiar with the IRB process (complete the CITI training) and the literature on fictional crime drama media.  Then the student will help refine the survey instrument for delivery (create actual questions, learn about the process of what makes a good/better question). If any IRB revisions are needed the student will have an opportunity to work through that experience (do the work and learn about the IRB experience). The student will learn how to use Survey Monkey and will do some of the work involved in setting up, delivery, and managing the survey and responses. The student will learn about survey response rates, follow-ups, and other aspects of managing a successful email survey. Finally, the student will learn about basic analysis and participate in that analysis.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will have the opportunity to present the work at a brown bag and at a regional conference with the other two members of the team (if the student so chooses). The student will get a very broad based experience not only about the technical aspects of research methodology and application, but the nuances and challenges of conducting the research. The students I have worked with over the last 3 semesters have found the reality check to be as informing as learning to put the technical aspects of classroom work into motion.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
A student with a social science background would obviously be preferable, and an interest in media/crime dramas would be helpful. A student who has taken research methods may find the work to be a way to apply what they learned in class, but it is not a requirement for me.

Additional comments that are relevant:
I have been working with undergraduate and graduate students over the last few semesters. They have found the experience to be interesting and rewarding. This past semester two of my undergraduate students presented at a regional conference with flying colors.

Faculty mentor: Stephani Williams, Criminology & Criminal Justice

F15:008: The Virtual Southside: Creating an Online Walking Tour using Ethnography & Oral Histories

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This is a research/creative project that builds upon the researcher’s experience developing the Historic Southside Mural at the Murdoch Center (2010-2011), and creating online learning tools for residents and visitors to Flagstaff’s Southside neighborhoods. Using oral histories, original videos and audio clips, GPS mapping, transcripts and lesson plans, the student intern will assist the principal researcher in preparing materials for an interactive webpage, linked to sites and historic individuals associated with the Murdoch Community Center mural (e.g, Wilson Riles’s house, Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, South Beaver School, Southwest Lumber Mill, NAU’s Code Talker Statue, Route 66 Train Station). The student will help transcribe videos, upload pictures and audio, and help research historic issues related to Southside’s development, the impact of the Rio de Flag relocation, and shifting demographics within the neighborhoods.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student intern will help assemble audio-visual materials, transcripts, maps and learning tools for uploading to a dedicated webpage; assist the faculty member in reviewing and researching new and existing oral histories; and assist in developing learning communities and walking tour “docents” who can engage learning online or in person at the Murdoch Community Center. The student intern will learn ethnography and audio-video techniques, the history of “segregation and congregation” in the Southside, and how a virtual walking tour can contribute to campus and community engagement.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern may be able to receive academic credit for their work, and perhaps contribute to a paper or presentation reflecting the ongoing history of the Southside. The experience working with neighborhood residents, participating in research activities at a community center, and helping develop a campus/community walking tour will enrich the student’s grasp of community building and the significance of Ethnic Studies to their own personal and professional development.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional qualifications:
Any experience or interest in audio-visual technologies, Web design, GPS mapping, or community work in the arts or education would be helpful.

Additional comments that are relevant.
Students from all academic backgrounds are encouraged to apply, as they will learn ethnographic techniques, video transcription, and lesson plan development. Course credit and classroom training through the Ethnic Studies Program are available. Enrolled students from other Ethnic Studies courses will provide resources for the intern and possibly help participate as “digital docents” to conduct real and virtual walking tours as the project unfolds. Other Ethnic Studies faculty and community residents can help implement the project at the end of the internship.

Faculty mentor:  Ricardo Guthrie, Ethnic Studies

F15:009: Representations of Sexual Minorities in South African Media: Does Same-Sex Marriage Matter?

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
In 2006, South Africa became the first African nation to pass national same-sex marriage legislation. Since that time, domestic and international media has presented South Africa as simultaneously “ahead” of its African counterparts in terms of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) rights, yet stricken with ongoing gendered and sexualized violence. Examining this more closely, how are sexual minorities represented in South African media? How did the passage of same-sex marriage legislation affect these representations? My research project investigates sexual minorities as they appear in South African media through an analysis of English language newspaper articles from 2000-2015.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
An intern on this project would assist me in coding newspaper articles during this time period using the qualitative coding software MAXQDA, as well as writing a literature review of existing scholarship on the subject. The student will learn

1) what 'coding' data is and how to do it using MAXQDA,
2) how to conduct an effective literature search and write a literature review,
3) what Grounded Theory is and how to develop and apply it,
4) strengths and limitations of using media data for scholarly arguments,
5) about contemporary South African politics and media, and
6) about theories of democratization and media.

Other benefits to the student:
After the internship is over, if the student wishes, s/he will become a second author on a paper to be presented at the Western Political Science Association in March 2016 in San Diego.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Additional comments that are relevant:
Few courses relating to contemporary Africa are offered on campus. The project is inherently interdisciplinary, pulling on scholarship from Political Science, History, Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies. This type of project allows students to become exposed to many diverse literatures and help them decide on what kind of career s/he would like to pursue.

Faculty mentor:  Julie Moreau, Women’s & Gender Studies