For Parents

Welcome to the NAU family! As a parent we understand your commitment to ensuring your student has the appropriate information and resources to use toward their individual pursuit of success. Many parents want to make sure their students take the right classes and have a good foundation for the rest of their college career. 

Guess what? We do too! 
Academic Transition Programs shares your concerns and our classes provide a strong foundation for your student to become successful during their first semester and continue that success throughout their entire college experience here at NAU. Our NAU 100 Peer Instructors and NAU 120 Peer Coaches are students who know the ropes and are able to guide your student toward personal growth, financial resources, health improvement strategies, supportive resources on campus and techniques to manage the responsibilities that come with college and adulthood. 

Why Should Your Student Take an ATP Course?

Your student should take an ATP class in order to healthily and effectively handle the new experiences many students face when entering college for the first time. During their first-year at NAU your students may experience emotional dispositions such as homesickness, stress management, conflict management, and boundary issues or go through non-academic transitional difficulties such as leaving home, living in a new environment, meeting new people, and operating on a different kind of schedule. Through ATP courses they will learn practical skills to ease or decrease transitional difficulties. Our courses strive to help your student in the following ways:

  • Get to know the campus, geographically, resources, etc.
  • Learn how to get around Flagstaff and explore their new town
  • Form new relationships and new conversation/interaction skills
  • Develop new skills (time management, money, studying)
  • Find and connect with resources 
  • Build their identity and discover more of who they are

NAU 100, NAU 120 and NAU 130 address all of the above issues and more, giving your student the foundations they need to succeed!

NAU 100: Transition to College FAQ’s

For Faculty and Parents

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is NAU 100?

NAU 100, Transition to College, is an eight week, one credit hour course taught by undergraduate Peer Instructors.  The course is designed to help first-year students get the information and skills they need in order to be successful at NAU. This class prepares first-year students for challenges they may face by exploring academic and life skills and by familiarizing them with campus resources that are designed to help students succeed.

Q: Is this course a requirement for all incoming first-year?

While this course is not required, it is highly recommended to students to help them get acclimated to college culture and expectations. The perks of NAU 100 are largely connected to the emphasis of student interaction with campus resources and services. 

Q: What is an Undergraduate Peer Instructor?

 

The Peer Instructors for NAU 100 are undergraduate students who are selected through an in-depth recruitment process that occurs a year before teaching begins. They are required to successfully complete a specialized class that centers on teaching, grading, activities, individual care and classroom management. Peer Instructors (PI’s) are invested in teaching this course because of their own personal experience being a new student on campus, and their own experience taking NAU 100 or NAU 120.

 

Q: Why should students enroll in this course?

The transition to college can be challenging for students as they navigate the world of NAU. Enrolling in the course offers them the chance to learn first-hand some of the secrets to being successful on our campus from an upperclassman. We cover a variety of topics including time management, health and wellness, financial literacy, study skills, diversity and healthy relationships. By working with other first-year students in the NAU 100 course, the students will have a community of other freshman with whom they can explore campus and its resources. Research has shown that students who successfully complete NAU 100 receive higher GPAs and are more likely to graduate.

NAU 120 FAQ’s

Q: Why should students take the class?

NAU 120 is specifically designed to provide support for first year students as they transition to college life. The course is to help ensure successful transition to NAU to all freshman students looking to improve their study habits and grades.

Q: What subjects/topics does the class cover? What is it about?

Based on the principles of self-regulated learning, NAU 120 addresses a combination of learning strategies including note and test taking methods, overcoming test anxiety, budgeting, the examination of university expectations and culture, as well as psychosocial skills like emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, health and wellness, conflict management, and stress management.

Q: What are some of the benefits of taking this class?

All 120 students are set up with a personal peer coach, who they meet with each week, providing a solid support system as they navigate the transition to college. Research has shown that students who take NAU 120 have a 6% increased retention rate, compared to those who chose not to participate in the class.

NAU130 FAQ’s

Q: Why do students take the class?

NAU 130: Back on Track, is a required eight-week course for freshman students who are on academic probation after their first semester at NAU.

Q: What is academic probation and how can a student transition off of it?

Academic probation occurs when a student’s cumulative grade point average falls below the following values:

Credit Units Earned

GPA Warranting Probation

0–14

less than 1.8

15–29

less than 1.9

30 or more

less than 2.0

 

To be removed from academic probation, students must improve their cumulative GPA to the minimum levels above. Students are considered on academic continuation if they achieve a term GPA of at least a 2.0. A student may be on academic continuation for multiple semesters as long as they achieve at least a 2.0 each term and are increasing their cumulative GPA. Students on probation may only register for 13 credit hours per term.

Q: What subjects/topics does the class cover? What is it about?

The purpose of NAU 130 is to aide students in identifying the behaviors and factors that may have contributed to their probationary academic status and to offer them the tools and learning strategies necessary to transition back to good academic standing. Students enrolled in the class can expect to engage in academic and personal strategies that foster success.  These include note taking, time management, campus resources, help seeking behavior, motivation strategies, stress management, and more.  The class is very personalized based on the individual needs of the student.

Q: What are some of the benefits of taking this class?

NAU 130 students foster their study skills, find empowerment, and develop help seeking behaviors. Additionally, all NAU 130 students are set up with a personal peer coach, who they meet with each week, providing a solid support system as they navigate their way back to good academic standing.

 

NAU 120 and 130 ASC-ME Coaching FAQ’s

Q: Why do students have to meet with a coach?

Coaching is an assignment for the class, and points will be earned toward the course grade for meeting with a coach. It is a chance to ask questions about the class, the campus, how and where to find help with all of your classes, and to learn insider tips and tricks from another NAU student. Each ASC-ME coach can help with time management, adjusting to the difference between high school and college, study habits and classes, as well as help find ways to get involved on campus.

Q: Who are the ASC-ME coaches?

The coaches are NAU sophomores, juniors and seniors who are interested in sharing what they’ve learned about being successful in college (both academically and personally) with other students. They are academically successful, and they’re usually involved in quite a few extracurricular activities, so they’re well connected on campus.

Q: How often do students have to meet with an ASC-ME coach?

Students meet with their coach for a half hour session about 10 times per semester for NAU 120 and 6 times per semester for NAU 130 in order to fulfill the course requirements.  Some students choose to continue meeting with their coaches after the course requirement has been met in order to stay connected and to continue receiving support.

Q: What kinds of things can the student talk about with the ASC-ME Coach?

Anything related to being a student at NAU!

Time management, study skills, help resources, getting involved on campus and meeting people, conflict resolution, staying healthy in the first year, stress management, college finances, and more!

 

 

Welcome to the NAU family! As a parent we understand your commitment to ensuring your student has the appropriate information and resources to use toward their individual pursuit of success. Many parents want to make sure their students take the right classes and have a good foundation for the rest of their college career. 

 

Guess what? We do too! 
Academic Transition Programs shares your concerns and our classes provide a strong foundation for your student to become successful during their first semester and continue that success throughout their entire college experience here at NAU. Our NAU 100 Peer Instructors and NAU 120 Peer Coaches are students who know the ropes and are able to guide your student toward personal growth, financial resources, health improvement strategies, supportive resources on campus and techniques to manage the responsibilities that come with college and adulthood. 

Why Should Your Student Take an ATP Course?

Your student should take an ATP class in order to healthily and effectively handle the new experiences many students face when entering college for the first time. During their first-year at NAU your students may experience emotional dispositions such as homesickness, stress management, conflict management, and boundary issues or go through non-academic transitional difficulties such as leaving home, living in a new environment, meeting new people, and operating on a different kind of schedule. Through ATP courses they will learn practical skills to ease or decrease transitional difficulties. Our courses strive to help your student in the following ways:

  • Get to know the campus, geographically, resources, etc.
  • Learn how to get around Flagstaff and explore their new town
  • Form new relationships and new conversation/interaction skills
  • Develop new skills (time management, money, studying)
  • Find and connect with resources 
  • Build their identity and discover more of who they are

NAU 100, NAU 120 and NAU 130 address all of the above issues and more, giving your student the foundations they need to succeed!

NAU 100: Transition to College FAQ’s

For Faculty and Parents

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is NAU 100?

NAU 100, Transition to College, is an eight week, one credit hour course taught by undergraduate Peer Instructors.  The course is designed to help first-year students get the information and skills they need in order to be successful at NAU. This class prepares first-year students for challenges they may face by exploring academic and life skills and by familiarizing them with campus resources that are designed to help students succeed.

Q: Is this course a requirement for all incoming first-year?

While this course is not required, it is highly recommended to students to help them get acclimated to college culture and expectations. The perks of NAU 100 are largely connected to the emphasis of student interaction with campus resources and services. 

Q: What is an Undergraduate Peer Instructor?

 

The Peer Instructors for NAU 100 are undergraduate students who are selected through an in-depth recruitment process that occurs a year before teaching begins. They are required to successfully complete a specialized class that centers on teaching, grading, activities, individual care and classroom management. Peer Instructors (PI’s) are invested in teaching this course because of their own personal experience being a new student on campus, and their own experience taking NAU 100 or NAU 120.

 

Q: Why should students enroll in this course?

The transition to college can be challenging for students as they navigate the world of NAU. Enrolling in the course offers them the chance to learn first-hand some of the secrets to being successful on our campus from an upperclassman. We cover a variety of topics including time management, health and wellness, financial literacy, study skills, diversity and healthy relationships. By working with other first-year students in the NAU 100 course, the students will have a community of other freshman with whom they can explore campus and its resources. Research has shown that students who successfully complete NAU 100 receive higher GPAs and are more likely to graduate.

NAU 120 FAQ’s

Q: Why should students take the class?

NAU 120 is specifically designed to provide support for first year students as they transition to college life. The course is to help ensure successful transition to NAU to all freshman students looking to improve their study habits and grades.

Q: What subjects/topics does the class cover? What is it about?

Based on the principles of self-regulated learning, NAU 120 addresses a combination of learning strategies including note and test taking methods, overcoming test anxiety, budgeting, the examination of university expectations and culture, as well as psychosocial skills like emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, health and wellness, conflict management, and stress management.

Q: What are some of the benefits of taking this class?

All 120 students are set up with a personal peer coach, who they meet with each week, providing a solid support system as they navigate the transition to college. Research has shown that students who take NAU 120 have a 6% increased retention rate, compared to those who chose not to participate in the class.

NAU130 FAQ’s

Q: Why do students take the class?

NAU 130: Back on Track, is a required eight-week course for freshman students who are on academic probation after their first semester at NAU.

Q: What is academic probation and how can a student transition off of it?

Academic probation occurs when a student’s cumulative grade point average falls below the following values:

Credit Units Earned

GPA Warranting Probation

0–14

less than 1.8

15–29

less than 1.9

30 or more

less than 2.0

 

To be removed from academic probation, students must improve their cumulative GPA to the minimum levels above. Students are considered on academic continuation if they achieve a term GPA of at least a 2.0. A student may be on academic continuation for multiple semesters as long as they achieve at least a 2.0 each term and are increasing their cumulative GPA. Students on probation may only register for 13 credit hours per term.

Q: What subjects/topics does the class cover? What is it about?

The purpose of NAU 130 is to aide students in identifying the behaviors and factors that may have contributed to their probationary academic status and to offer them the tools and learning strategies necessary to transition back to good academic standing. Students enrolled in the class can expect to engage in academic and personal strategies that foster success.  These include note taking, time management, campus resources, help seeking behavior, motivation strategies, stress management, and more.  The class is very personalized based on the individual needs of the student.

Q: What are some of the benefits of taking this class?

NAU 130 students foster their study skills, find empowerment, and develop help seeking behaviors. Additionally, all NAU 130 students are set up with a personal peer coach, who they meet with each week, providing a solid support system as they navigate their way back to good academic standing.

 

NAU 120 and 130 ASC-ME Coaching FAQ’s

Q: Why do students have to meet with a coach?

Coaching is an assignment for the class, and points will be earned toward the course grade for meeting with a coach. It is a chance to ask questions about the class, the campus, how and where to find help with all of your classes, and to learn insider tips and tricks from another NAU student. Each ASC-ME coach can help with time management, adjusting to the difference between high school and college, study habits and classes, as well as help find ways to get involved on campus.

Q: Who are the ASC-ME coaches?

The coaches are NAU sophomores, juniors and seniors who are interested in sharing what they’ve learned about being successful in college (both academically and personally) with other students. They are academically successful, and they’re usually involved in quite a few extracurricular activities, so they’re well connected on campus.

Q: How often do students have to meet with an ASC-ME coach?

Students meet with their coach for a half hour session about 10 times per semester for NAU 120 and 6 times per semester for NAU 130 in order to fulfill the course requirements.  Some students choose to continue meeting with their coaches after the course requirement has been met in order to stay connected and to continue receiving support.

Q: What kinds of things can the student talk about with the ASC-ME Coach?

Anything related to being a student at NAU!

Time management, study skills, help resources, getting involved on campus and meeting people, conflict resolution, staying healthy in the first year, stress management, college finances, and more!