I2S Available Internships

ONLY students who meet the following criteria are eligible to apply for an I2S internship:

  • Enrolled full-time and in good academic standing at the Flagstaff Mountain campus at the time of application and at the commencement of an internship
  • Admitted as a degree-seeking student pursuing a first bachelor's degree
  • Successfully completed at least one full-time semester at NAU
  • Completed less than 75 semester hours (including transfer credits) when the internship begins.
  • International students: Check with your international adviser in CIE to determine your eligibility for employment at NAU

The application period for the Fall 2016 semester internships is August 1 - September 11, 2016.

APPLICANTS: Consult the I2S Student Information and Student FAQ pages for application advice and more information about the program. 

NOTE: To log into the application form, your NAU password must NOT have special characters such as these (?, period, [, {, }, ], |). If your password has one or more of these characters, you will need to first change your password in the NAU system.
Interested in what the application requires? This document lists the required information on the application form.

ONLINE APPLICATION FORM

You should receive an email with your application responses.

You may apply for up to 3 internships during this application period. However, each internship will require a completing a SEPARATE application form. When you have completed and submitted your first application, you may log in again and complete the next one.  A word of advice: Be sure to tailor each application to the specific activities and expectations described for that position.

All communications or questions regarding these I2S internships, including the responsibilities, requirements, timeline, applications, and selection processes, should be directed to the Undergraduate Research Coordinator.

Fall 2016 Internships 

The Internship ID number is shown to the left of the title (e.g., F16.001)

F16.001: Kumaon’s Ramsay and Ramsay’s Kumaon: Facets of Belonging in 19th Century Himalayas

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
I am trying to write a historical biography of one of lesser known but fascinating figures from the British colonial period in India -- Sir Henry Ramsay (1816-1893), a long-serving Commissioner of the region of Kumaon in Himalayan India. My existing research reveals that Ramsay clearly felt that he both "belonged" to Kumaon, and that Kumaon belonged to him. A critical source for this study are letters that Sir Henry may have written home, or, even better, a collection of his personal papers. None of the major depositories in the U.K. or India have any such collection. I am confident that with the assistance of a student intern I will be able to locate at least some of these letters.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
DO: An intern will compile a list of Sir Henry's living descendants using Peerage.Com and other internet sites. The intern will then write letters or emails to this large number of family members and follow up to see if we can locate any remaining papers. The intern will also run repeat searches and send requests to depositories in the U.K. and India for such information as might be useful for the project.  LEARN: Under my supervision, an intern will learn important skills of historical research. Given that today so many sources of information are moving to a digital platform, this is a skill set that will be of tremendous importance to any student whether or not they choose to pursue a career as a historian or take other career options.

Other benefits to the student:
In addition, the intern will learn skills of polite but persuasive communication to write to descendants of Sir Henry to ask them to explore histories of their family. Finally, almost as a side-effect of this project, s/he will learn about a slice of history from the colonial era in India.

Additional qualifications:
An intense curiosity and ability to be persistent is crucial, as are good skills at navigating the internet. The ability to write coherent and persuasive prose is another quality that an intern on this project will require. An interest in history would help the student gain more from the project than otherwise, but is a preferred rather than required qualification.

Time commitment: 4 hours/week for 11 weeks

Faculty mentor: Sanjay Joshi, History

F16.002: Restoration Experiments in Ponderosa Pine at Ft Valley Experimental Forest: Twenty Years Post-Fire

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
We will remeasure the 20-year post-fire response of vegetation and fuels on a restoration experiment in a ponderosa pine-bunchgrass ecosystem on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest (FVEF) near Flagstaff, AZ. We will quantify changes in key response variables related to post-fire fuels and plant succession in southwestern ponderosa pine, such as old growth tree and post-settlement tree structure, pine regeneration, understory cover and diversity. We will examine the interaction of prescribed fire and drought on tree growth and mortality, regeneration, herbaceous production and diversity over this 20-year period.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The undergraduate student (UG) will learn how to collect field data including increment cores from trees on specific restoration treatments (thin, thin and prescribe burn, and control). In addition to the field data, the UG will work in the lab to learn how to mount and read tree increment cores. The cores are used to determine tree age and growth related to treatment effect and/or climate variables. The student will enter these data into a database. If the student is interested, s/he will also learn how to cross-date tree rings to verify tree establishment date, age, and mortality (year of death, when applicable) using specific software programs (such as COFECHA).

Other benefits to the student:
The undergraduate student will benefit from working alongside School of Forestry and Ecological Restoration Institute staff and graduate students to collect field and lab data; and interpret those results. If the student is interested, s/he could also learn how to collect forest fuels data on transects and grass and wildflower plant identification, which are skills related to this project. The student will also be exposed to other projects and broader issues of ecological restoration, fire-dependent plant communities, and climate change.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Margaret M. Moore, Forestry

 

F16.003: Multi-Modal Signal Processing to Identify Heart Abnormalities using Wireless Health Monitoring Device

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
In this project, we will develop signal processing methods to analyze ECG signal and accelerometer measurements in order to monitor the heart behavior and physical activity of a patient under monitoring. The signals are collected by a micro-controller board and will be transmitted to the computer using wireless communication module. We will investigate different wireless technologies including Bluetooth, WiFi, Cellular, and Zigbee protocol.  The immediate outcome of this project will be prototyping the customizable heart monitoring device which is capable of monitoring patient’s vital signals and timely prediction of abnormalities based on the health history of the user. The first version of this device is under development by a group of 6 undergraduate students and has already shown promising results. More specifically, the “patient-specific” property will be added to the platform by implementing the training and test phases using advanced multi-modal signal processing and machine learning techniques.

What the student will DO and LEARN:

  • Developing signal processing and Graphical User Interface (GUI) modules in MATLAB: the student will learn about MATLAB programming, signal processing techniques (filtering, smoothing, statistical analysis, and spectrum analysis).
  • Developing training and test phases: the student will learn basic concepts in machine learning.
  • Wireless platform design: the student will learn about different wireless communications techniques and also will train to program a wireless module (e.g. Arduino wireless shield).
  • Developing communication software for android: the student will learn how to write a program for cell-phone in order to provide long range connectivity.

Other benefits to the student:

The intern will work closely with me and my graduate students and other undergraduates as a team. The student will learn fundamental concepts of wireless networking, signal processing and machine learning. The intern will also gain experience on embedded systems, programming and trouble-shooting. These skills will help the intern to be successful in related courses as well as finding high-tech engineering jobs after graduation.

Additional qualifications:

  • MATLAB and C programming
  • Familiarity with hardware design (micro-controllers)
  • Basic knowledge in signal processing
  • Proficiency in Android software design is a plus (not required)
  • Proficiency in FPGA design is a plus (not required)

Time commitment: 5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Abolfazl Razi, School of Informatics, Computing, & Cyber Systems

 

F16.004: Development of a Processor for Prioritized Execution of Parallel Tasks CANCELLED

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The heart of any computing system is known as the processor, a device that runs software programs to accomplish tasks. The growth of the internet of things (IoT) is currently constrained by limitations of current processor architectures for edge devices and gateways, which are hindering responsiveness, effective security, software reliability, and both programmer and energy efficiency. In IoT applications, the computational workloads—real-time processing of multiple event streams—differ from the interactive and transactional loads seen by personal computing devices and servers but the architectures and microarchitectures of current IoT processors remain remarkably similar. IoT workloads will be dominated by multiple sensing and actuation tasks in which asynchronous streams of physical events are processed, stored, and transmitted. This functionality is a poor fit to current microarchitectures; programmers must explicitly split natural stream processing workflows into event handlers and background processing tasks, and merge interrupt-driven handlers with via priority-based multitasking. At the same time, they must consider energy efficiency by managing a daunting array of power and clock domains and hibernation modes.

The proposed project will study how the unique workloads of IoT edge devices and gateways can motivate more efficient hardware/software architectures. First, we will design and optimize hardware support for fine-scale prioritization of task execution. The needed mechanisms will include efficient storage of instruction-level metadata that supports both priority (which competing tasks are awarded compute resources) and atomicity (how long a winning task can hold onto them).

What the student will DO and LEARN:

  • Develop and test prototype processors on field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA's) using modern tools and languages
  • Learn advanced skills in digital hardware design
  • Learn the system-on-chip design process

Other benefits to the student: 
Learning about the internet of things, considered by many to be the "next internet"

Additional qualifications:
Completion of EE 310 Fundamentals of Computer Engineering

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Paul Flikkema, School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems

 

F16.005: Manufacturing Novel Nanomaterials

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The student will learn how to utilize a system in my laboratory which is already operational to fabricate nanomaterials and to characterize them. The project will be to fabricate materials which have not been manufactured before.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will learn how to use the deposition system and how the system can be programmed in order to fabricate materials with desired features and applications. Initially, the student will simply learn the technique, but will then be able to use his or her knowledge to make a new type of material which, to the best of my knowledge, has never been demonstrated before. The student will also learn how to write programs to make specific materials and to characterize these using spectroscopic techniques.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will learn to use a state-of-the-art deposition system for making nanomaterials and will have this experience on their resume. Further, the a wide range of new skills will be gained including familiarity with vacuum systems, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, as well as learning to program hardware on the system. The student is expected to be semi-autonomous by the end of the semester.

Additional qualifications:
Applicant should have a desire to work in an experimental physics laboratory. Some basic knowledge of physics is necessary (at least 2 semesters of introductory physics). If a student is knowledgeable in programming hardware, that would be helpful, but not entirely necessary. The ideal candidate would come from the Physics and Astronomy Department. However, students from mathematics, engineering, chemistry, or even some biology students may be qualified for the project.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: John Gibbs, Physics & Astronomy

 

F16.006: Use of Photogrammetry to Model and Analyze Historic Structures

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The goal of this project is to create a three-dimensional model of an historical structure from high-resolution photographs. Once created, this model will then be distilled into a format for conducting a structural analysis. "Photogrammetry" is the science of making three-dimensional measurements from two-dimensional photographs. Based on principles of feature recognition and triangulation, photogrammetry can collect coordinates of specific points on a structure and solve for spatial relationships between features. From the standpoint of a structural engineer, the application of photogrammetry has great value in the field of forensics - where size, complexity, historical value, or combination make traditional measurement methods more cumbersome. However, photogrammetry has yet to gain acceptance from the mainstream engineering community.

What the student will DO and LEARN:

  • Collaborate with the Park Service to identify a structure
  • Conduct trials to calibrate camera and software settings, and collection procedure
  • Collect photogrammetric data
  • Create a model for structural analysis
  • Document methodology and results
  • Disseminate results (via poster sessions and, potentially, conference proceedings)

Other benefits to the student:
This project will give the student professional experience in a rapidly advancing field of structural engineering. However, this technology has many applications in other disciplines including geology, archaeology, architecture, biology, and film animation.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Robin Tuchscherer, CECMEE

 

F16.007: Acoustic Mechanisms of Reproductive Isolation in Vocal Rodents

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The goal of this research is to understand the evolutionary processes and neurophysiological mechanisms that underlie intraspecific divergence in the production of an acoustic mating signal, and the role of this signal in the evolution of reproductive isolation. We focus on the contribution of call frequency to premating isolation between a cryptic species pair of grasshopper mice (Onychomys) in the desert Southwest. Grasshopper mice produce long-distance advertisement vocalizations that coordinate reproduction, and geographic variation in call fundamental frequency is concordant with a pattern expected from reproductive character displacement. We will use a combination of field and laboratory studies, playback experiments, laboratory crosses, and biomechanical analyses to determine 1) whether population differences in signal and receiver response are consistent with reproductive character displacement, 2) whether selection against hybridization could explain this pattern, and 3) the physiological and anatomical basis of population differences in this vocal phenotype.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
DO: animal husbandry, behavioral experiments, electrophysiological experiments, blood sampling, animal dissections.  LEARN: hands-on training with animals; proficiency in use of hardware and software; organization, analysis, & presentation of data; develop strong conceptual foundations in animal behavior and physiology

Other benefits to the student:
Opportunities to present research at local & national meetings, co-authorship on publication

Additional qualifications:
Experience with animal handling and husbandry preferred but not required. Intern will need to complete requisite IACUC and animal care training to work with animals if selected for the position.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Bret Pasch, Biological Sciences

 

F16.008: Molecular Examination of Hybridization of Gilded and Northern Flickers

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Gilded and Northern flickers are suspected to hybridize where their ranges overlap in central and southern Arizona. This has never been confirmed using molecular methods. This suspected hybridization will be important in the future, as Gilded flickers are a species of conservation concern. Gilded flickers rely on Saguaro cacti for nest and roost sites, and their range may contract in the future as Saguaro cacti suffer the consequences of climate change. Knowing how hybridization is affecting gene flow between populations of Gilded and Northern flickers will inform wildlife managers about the importance of this hybridization for conservation of the Gilded flicker. Using microsatellite markers previously developed for the Northern flicker, we will assess gene flow between Gilded and Northern flickers to analyze gene flow between populations, which, if present, is likely the result of hybridization.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will learn common laboratory techniques including pipetting, reagent handling, stoichiometric calculations; will learn how to use common laboratory equipment (centrifuges, thermocyclers, spectrophotometer, genetic analyzer); and will perform tissue digestion, DNA extraction and quantification, gel electrophoresis, DNA amplification using PCR, and microsatellite analysis in the Biology Department’s Environmental Genetics & Genomics Lab. At the end of the internship the intern will have the opportunity to expand his/her synthesis and public presentation skills.  The intern will be encouraged to summarize his/her findings in a poster to be presented at NAU’s Undergraduate Research and Design Symposium. The skills that will be learned are industry standards and useful in a variety of life science fields, including conservation biology, health sciences, and biomedical research and engineering.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will gain hands-on work experience in a molecular biology lab, acquire advanced skills in genetic analysis, participate in cutting-edge population genetics analysis, and contribute in the understanding of hybridization and its conservation implications. This activity will provide a professional development experience that can clarify and solidify the intern’s understanding and expectations of research and scholarly activities.

Additional qualifications:
The intern should have a GPA no less than 3.0, have excelled (with a grade of A or B) coursework in basic biology, chemistry, genetics and/or molecular biology.  In addition, personal skills such as patience, attention to detail, and perseverance would increase the intern’s likelihood of success. DNA extraction can involve a long period of time incubating the samples; this requires having the patience to stay in the lab until the sample is done incubating, which can take up to 4 hours.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Russell Benford, Biological Sciences

 

F16.009: Examining the Relationship of Self-Regulated Learning to Student Success

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The following research questions will be addressed:

  • Do student’s attributions for academic probation status predict academic success (operationally defined as academic standing, GPA, retention)?
  • Do other factors related to self-regulation (operationally defined as Motivation to Learn, Metacognition and Strategic Learning), predict academic success (operationally defined as academic standing, GPA, retention)?

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will be able to engage in all aspects of the research project including data collection, data cleaning, data coding and transformation, literature review, hypothesis testing, review statistical analysis and developing importance from results, writing and editing at least 1 paper for publication. This project will also involve 2 other tenure track faculty so this will support their research efforts as well as provide the student an opportunity to be involved in a collaborative research team.

Other benefits to the student:
It is difficult for undergraduate psychology or education students to identify research projects. I would anticipate that an undergraduate student with plans to continue in a graduate program would benefit from not only the experience but from any presentation and publications that might result.

Additional qualifications:
Skills in performing data entry and library literature reviews.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Rebecca Campbell, Educational Psychology

 

F16.010: Culturally Responsive Teacher Self-Efficacy

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This on-going project is examining the culturally responsive teacher self-efficacy of our Professional Educational Programs from application through student teaching. We are using a teacher self-efficacy instrument (CRTSE) which is run through the Professional Education Unit for accreditation. We are examining the various factors that may affect preservice teacher's efficacy which is their belief to work effectively with children from diverse backgrounds. The student would be involved in helping to clean and run data, as well as write up analysis. Graduate students have been involved for the last year and a half building the data infrastructure and we are now at a place to have undergraduates work with us.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will learn how to clean a data set, identify and procure data from the data warehouse, run descriptive statistics and correlations. We may be running more sophisticated analysis, but are not sure at this time. The student will learn how to work with data and its implications for program review. We will include a presentation to the PEP as well as possible involvement in publications.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will gain a lot from working with an interdisciplinary team of researchers, faculty and graduate students. In addition, s/he will gain an understanding of the role of data in the field of education.

Additional qualifications:
An interest in educational issues, in particular regarding children from diverse backgrounds or the individual could be interested in issues of diversity in general. A student who wants to have experience and/or an interest in statistics is preferred.

Time commitment: 5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Gretchen McAllister, Teaching & Learning

 

F16.011: Evaluation of the Navajo Nation's Good Health & Wellness in Indian Country Project POSTPONED to Sp2017

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The Navajo Nation has been awarded a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Good Health & Wellness in Indian Country (GHWIC) - and a team that I am leading will subcontract for evaluation services. Briefly, the aim of this project is to implement healthy eating and active living opportunities, tobacco cessation, and community health workers within the Navajo Nation. This 3 year project (2016-2019) will seek to evaluate efforts under the GHWIC banner.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The I2S intern would be fully immersed in the research and evaluation process. This would include formulating evaluation processes, data collection, data analyses and interpretation, and reporting. For example, the I2S student may conduct key informant interview(s) or environmental scans, analyze data, and provide a report on the findings.

Other benefits to the student:
The I2S student will be provided an opportunity for professional networking in northern AZ and beyond (e.g., CDC, evaluation partners throughout the US and tribal partners). Additionally, students will learn cultural nuance, strict attention to detail, and working within a collaborative group. The intern’s work may result in professional presentation(s) and publication(s).

Additional qualifications:
It is preferred, though not required, that the I2S scholar be Navajo.

Timeline commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Tim Behrens, Health Sciences

 

F16.012: Frybread: Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Native America

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
I'm working with a small media team in researching, shooting, and editing a documentary about the Native American food sovereignty movement. We plan to create a series of short films, highlighting different movements in the region--from the Navajo Nation to Tohono O'odham Nation south of Tucson.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will help research, organize footage, production assist, and transcribe interviews--valuable as a team member in helping to create a documentary. The intern may also be involved in a social media campaign.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will learn the documentary film production process with a team of professionals.

Additional qualifications:
We need someone who is organized, a team player, and a creative contributor for the vision of this film. We expect this project to continue into the spring term, as well.

Time commitment: 5 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Kurt Lancaster, Creative Media and Film

 

F16.013: Classroom Simulations: Downsides and Challenges

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This research project will focus around the creation of a scholarly paper to be presented at the 2017 American Political Science Association's Teaching and Learning Conference. I intend to write and present a paper building upon earlier papers I have written on the advantages and uses of simulations, especially simulations in large introductory courses. This project will use the student as a research assistant to gather literature regarding problems with simulations that focuses upon a wide range of fields, including psychology, sociology, political science, and the scholarship of teaching and learning, in order to dig deeply into difficulties in creating and carrying out meaningful and educational simulations.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will learn how to carry out scholarly research, how to structure a literature review, how to write an annotated bibliography, and how to organize the information gathered into an outline.  The student will do a great deal of research to find appropriate scholarly articles. S/he will read the articles, annotate the argument, organize the various articles into appropriate categories, and will put them together into an outline.

Other benefits to the student:
S/he will learn about the topic of active learning simulations and about various issues associated with problems in running simulations from across a variety of fields.

Additional qualifications:
Good research skills, good writing skills, timely, organized, self-directed.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Gretchen Knudson Gee, Politics & International Affairs

 

F16.014: Hypnotically-Suggested Peripheral Vasomotor Control

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Over the past several years, I have been investigating the effects on brain activity (EEG neuroimaging) and peripheral (fingers) blood flow measures of specialized suggestions presented under hypnosis to human participants stratified by trait hypnotizability. The implications of this study are important for control of essential hypertension, as some of the suggestions are for vasodilation which can lower blood pressure. Data collection has proceeded over the years with some interruptions for other projects.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The I2S Intern will assist in recruiting and scheduling research participants, implement hypnotizability testing of participants, assist the faculty PI in conducting EEG and peripheral vasomotor studies of participants, assist in the processing and analysis of data and its preparation for presentation, and assist in the presentation of outcomes of this study. The Intern will learn all of these procedures and will experience the excitement of conducting this fascinating research investigation.

Other benefits to the student:
S/he will present the results of this study at regional and national conferences and will participate in the preparation of scholarship manuscripts from this study. These outcomes should significantly advance the intern's career.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Larry Stevens, Psychological Sciences

 

F16.015: The Mayan King's Procession

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
The Mayan King’s Procession is a digital reconstruction of a Mayan site in St. Ignacio, Belize, in collaboration with Dr. Jaime Jose Awe, Assistant Professor of Anthropology. This project proposes to create a fully immersive reconstruction of the Mayan site and create a first person experience of the burial of a Mayan King.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will work in a small research project team to develop a proof of concept for Dr. Awe using graphical programming within gaming engines. S/he will learn how to work with 3d and graphical assets to program and implement the virtual reality simulation. The intern will also learn how to work and develop software for virtual reality goggles.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will get real-world experience working in project teams to create a virtual reality demo. S/he will be working on a real-world project with a researcher from the University and will get to work in a field that is very new with many job possibilities upon graduation.

Additional qualifications:
Applicants should know programming, not limited to C and C++, must be able to quickly learn and work with visual scripting for Unreal Engine 4, and have an interest in gaming engines.  Applicants should have an interest in programming for 3d assets. Some of the work is highly technical; the student must enjoy the challenge of learning these new technologies and also work with others closely to solve problems.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Giovanni Castillo, Visual Communications

 

F16.016: Sex from the Margins: Global History of Sexual Science from Bombay, 1930s-50s

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Sex from the Margins deliberately chooses a global frame for the history of sexology, using Bombay and its resident sexologist, A. P. Pillay, as a point of entry. In the person of Pillay and his transnational publications such as Marriage Hygiene (MH) and The International Journal of Sexology (IJS), Bombay became a gateway for global sexological conversations. His career allows us to disrupt the neat, self-referential, Euro-American history of sexual sciences, so often represented as the norm. My use of the global in this book project illuminates the multiple circuits within which knowledge, people, print capital, financial resources, and power diffused and circulated to create shared, yet competitive and unequal communities. In simultaneously shifting the geographical imageries and highlighting historiographical partialities and prejudices, Sex from the Margins unsettles what has so far been represented as an overwhelmingly Western narrative of the history of sexology.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
DO: The student intern will peruse two journals, the Marriage Hygiene and International Journal of Sexology, to highlight relevant articles for my book project. The intern will also conduct google scholar searches for scholarly articles and books relevant to my field of research. LEARN: This research will expose the student to historical research and make them aware of the important academic debates within feminist scholarship on sexuality and sexual sciences.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern will be able to draw upon this research to craft her/his own class projects and research papers related to the broad fields of feminist scholarship on sexuality, body, sexual science, world history, and reproductive rights.

Additional qualifications:
Familiarity with navigating the web and google scholar to identify relevant research materials

Time commitment: 4 hours/week for 10 weeks

Faculty mentor: Sanjam Ahluwalia, Women & Gender Studies and History

 

Sp16:009: The Virtual Southside: Creating an Online Walking Tour using Ethnography & Oral Histories - FALL SEMESTER ONLY

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This is a research/creative project that builds upon the researcher’s experience developing the Historic Southside Mural at the Murdoch Center (2010-2011), and creating online learning tools for residents and visitors to Flagstaff’s Southside neighborhoods. Using oral histories, original videos and audio clips, GIS mapping, transcripts and lesson plans, the student intern will assist the principal researcher in preparing materials for an interactive webpage, linked to sites and historic individuals associated with the Murdoch Community Center mural (e.g, Wilson Riles’s house, Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, South Beaver School, Southwest Lumber Mill, NAU’s Code Talker Statue, Route 66 Train Station). The student will help transcribe videos, upload pictures and audio, and help research historic issues related to Southside’s development, the impact of the Rio de Flag relocation, and shifting demographics within the neighborhoods.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student intern will help assemble audio-visual materials, transcripts, maps and learning tools for uploading to a dedicated webpage; assist the faculty member in reviewing and researching new and existing oral histories; and assist in developing learning communities and walking tour “docents” who can engage learning online or in person at the Murdoch Community Center. The student intern will learn ethnography and audio-video techniques, the history of “segregation and congregation” in the Southside, and how a virtual walking tour can contribute to campus and community engagement.

Other benefits to the student:
The intern may be able to receive academic credit for their work, and perhaps contribute to a paper or presentation reflecting the ongoing history of the Southside. The experience working with neighborhood residents, participating in research activities at a community center, and helping develop a campus/community walking tour will enrich the student’s grasp of community building and the significance of Ethnic Studies to his/her own personal and professional development.

Additional qualifications:
Any experience or interest in audio-visual technologies, Web design, GIS mapping, or community work in the arts or education would be helpful.

Additional comments that are relevant.
Students from all academic backgrounds are encouraged to apply to learn ethnographic techniques, video transcription, and lesson plan development. Course credit and classroom training through the Ethnic Studies Program are available. Enrolled students from other Ethnic Studies courses will provide resources for the intern and possibly help participate as “digital docents” to conduct real and virtual walking tours as the project unfolds. Other Ethnic Studies faculty and community residents can help implement the project at the end of the internship.

Time commitment:  6 hours/week for 12 weeks - FALL SEMESTER ONLY!

Faculty mentor:  Ricardo Guthrie, Ethnic Studies

 

F16.017: NAU Native American Oral History Project

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
This project is designed to capture the experiences of Northern Arizona University Native American students and alumni. This oral history project seeks to document and better understand the Native American educational experience and cultural differences at Northern Arizona University. The principle investigators will conduct 6-10 oral histories in the first year of the project, which will be made widely available through the Colorado Plateau Archives. They emphasize that this project supports the University’s strategic goals of Inclusion, Civility, and Respect (Goal 5) and Commitment to Native Americans (Goal 6) by raising awareness that the Native American educational experience is unique, by celebrating the achievements of NAU NA students and alums, and by acknowledging the challenges faced by NAU NA students and alums. It is hoped that the stories and experiences shared by the narrators will be of value for current and prospective NAU Native American students.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The intern will work with faculty member (Daisy Purdy) to research background content on Native Americans in higher education, will be trained in capturing/recording/sharing oral histories by the head of Special Collections and Archives (Peter Runge), and will research and learn culturally appropriate methods for interviews with an NAU Librarian and POS PhD Candidate (Carissa Tsosie). Below is an outline of the shared responsibilities for collaborators including the I2S student:
1) Identify potential narrators
2) Conduct research on narrators
3) Conduct interview with narrator
4) Execute IRB approved consent and deed of gift for interview
5) Ingest interviews into SCA collections and digital archives
6) Send out a copy of the interview to be transcribed
7) Provide transcription and interview for narrator’s review
8) Give copy of interview and transcription to narrator
9) Add descriptive metadata to interview and transcription
10) Upload digital files to digital archives

Other benefits to the student:
A comprehensive understanding of technical, interpersonal skills and cultural skills essential to conducting research and collecting stories of this nature. An appreciation for the validation of oral histories as a legitimate academic source and expression of lived condition. Methods for humanizing underrepresented and sharing voice on topics of importance. A strong sense of reciprocity as an integral component of being a student and global citizen.

Additional qualifications:
A sincere interest in the project; organization and communication skills.

Time commitment:
6 hours/week for 10 weeks

Faculty mentor: Jamie Daisy Purdy, Native American Student Services

 

F16.018: Recognizing Human Faces in the Context of Reduced Snow Pack

Description of the project that the student intern will support:
Decreasing annual snow pack throughout western North America and the resulting reduction of available stored water and water quantity for agricultural purposes will not only impact agricultural output, but this climate change induced reduction will also impact the numerous agriculturally-based communities throughout the West. A modification of crop mix combined with reduced agricultural land use stemming from reduced snow pack is likely to reduce some agricultural income and employment. Understanding the snow/water/energy/food nexus throughout the west is vital. Using qualitative contingent valuation methods, in-person interviews and surveys have been completed with community leaders (mayors, Chambers of Commerce, hydro-based electricity providers, National Forest offices, etc.) to evaluate their concerns regarding decreasing agricultural income and employment in Arizona, California, Oregon, and Washington. Whereas agricultural-based output accounts for less than 2% of economic output value throughout the western states, many urban and rural communities heavily rely on this output for their very existence. Thus, reductions in snow-based and aquifer-based irrigation will have severe impacts on said communities. This series of interviews examined the importance of agriculture in terms of secondary impacts on local economies such as tractor and chemical dealers, doctors and dentists, waitresses and cooks, and even palm readers through the eyes of community leaders. The current project will be to develop these interviews and additional secondary research to report the findings for targeted journal articles.

What the student will DO and LEARN:
The student will research the basic demographics and economic profiles for the communities and counties involved with this study, thereby increasing her/his ability to conduct secondary research using a variety of data bases such as the Census website. Additionally, the student, following a detailed research, will provide descriptions of the relevant water programs for the same locations. Thus, the student will learn the skills necessary to read and understand complex regulatory agreements and then synthesize those readings into concise written descriptions.

Other benefits to the student:
The student will necessarily learn the complexities of water law, regulation and utilization in the western states. The student will be an active member in an active research project with distinct output targets. Time management skills to meet project targets while juggling course work and any employment will be further developed.

Additional qualifications for the intern:
ECO 284 or ECO 284H. CIS 120 would be very helpful.

Time commitment: 6 hours/week for 12 weeks

Faculty mentor: Dean Howard Smith, Economics