Diversity Subcommittee

The Diversity Committee, a sub-committee of the University Curriculum Committee (UCC), was created to review courses submitted to meet the diversity requirements and to review petitions for student experiences and transfer courses that fall outside established NAU policies and courses.

Global Diversity Awareness

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Educational  Goals:

A Global Diversity Awareness course syllabus should address the Primary Goal plus one or more of the following secondary educational goals:

     Primary Educational Goal:

  • Students will acquire an understanding of the perspectives (e.g. theoretical; historical; social; political; economic; cultural; religious; geographic or sense of place; environmental; or intellectual traditions and/ or ways of knowing) of non-Western peoples.

    Secondary Educational Goals:

  • Students will learn about issues of difference with respect to non-Western regions or peoples.
  • Students will learn terminology, vocabulary, and means of conceptualizing the social world.
  • Students will learn about the values and histories underlying non-Western civilizations.
  • Students will develop a greater understanding of themselves and respect for the complex identities of others, their histories, and their cultures.
  • Students will develop a discernment of the ethical consequences of decisions and actions particularly with respect to intellectual honesty.
  • Students will have the ability to interpret and evaluate information from a variety of sources pertaining to Global Diversity, demonstrating analytical or critical thinking skills, or problem solving abilities.

List of potential topics related to Educational Goals:

Global Diversity Awareness courses will generally focus on at least one or more non-Western peoples.  Global Awareness courses that focus on Western regions or peoples must enable students   to attain the above goals by either including a significant comparative content with non-Western peoples or demonstrating historical and/or contemporary examples of difference, power, and discrimination.

Explanatory Note:  course content and not course name is the important decision criterion for meeting the educational goals of this requirement.  For example, learning a foreign language frequently offers insight into a culture different than one's own. However, courses that primarily emphasize grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation would not be considered adequate to build global awareness. Thus, non-English language courses that offer significant cultural insights could be eligible to meet the global awareness requirement.  Similarly, courses with a European focus that address issues of marginalized peoples, colonialism, and their relationship to the dominant culture could also qualify.

Type of Student Learning Expectations/Outcomes desired in courses:

(Note:  Specific Student Learning/Expectations/Outcomes would come from course syllabi.  However, information regarding desired Student Learning Expectations/Outcomes would help communicate to faculty what the committee wants students to learn, know, and display.  These Student Learning Expectations in course syllabi should focus on specific non-Western or marginalized peoples.  These are only intended as general examples; however they focus on the cognitive, affective, and interpersonal domains of development.)

Examples:

  • Communicate effectively in writing the impacts of the AIDS virus on the cultural, economic, and social structures of sub-Sahara Africa.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the events that led to the Lebanese civil war beginning in the 1970s.
  • Describe the social and cultural structures that contributed to the ability of the Hmong peoples of Southeast Asia to live within the sustainable limits of their physical environment.
  • Explain the impacts of the forced assimilation of Aboriginal children in Australia on the dominant society, on these children, and on the larger Aboriginal culture.
  • Trace the growth of the Islam religion, its spread over time, and the variations of this religion as practiced today.
  • Discuss the ethical implications and cultural impacts on traditional societies of the patenting of genomes.
  • Describe the role of the Japanese occupation of China and Southeast Asia during World War II on the rise of nationalism in these areas.

U.S. Ethnic Diversity

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Educational  Goals:

A U.S. Ethnic course syllabus should address the Primary Educational Goal and one or more of the following Secondary Educational Goals:

     Primary Educational Goal:

  • Students will acquire an understanding of the perspectives (e.g.theoretical; historical; social; political; economic; cultural; religious; geographic or sense of place; environmental; or intellectual traditions and/ or ways of knowing) of U.S. ethnic minorities.

    Secondary Educational Goals:

  • Students will learn about issues of difference with respect to U.S. ethnic minorities.
  • Students will learn terminology, vocabulary, and means of conceptualizing the social world.
  • Students will learn about the contributions of U.S. ethnic minorities in U.S. democracy and western civilization.
  • Students will develop a greater understanding of themselves and respect for the complex identities of others, their histories, and their cultures.
  • Students will develop a discernment of the ethical consequences of decisions and actions particularly with respect to intellectual honesty.
  • Students will have the ability to interpret and evaluate information from a variety of sources pertaining to U.S. Ethnic Diversity, demonstrating analytical or critical thinking skills, or problem solving abilities.

List of potential topics related to Educational Goals:

U.S. Ethnic courses will primarily focus on the perspectives of one or more of the following U.S. ethnic groups:

  • African American
  • Alaskan Native
  • American Indian
  • Asian American
  • Pacific Islander
  • Latino/a

Courses meeting this requirement can use approaches such as the theoretical; historical; social; political; economic; cultural; religious; geographic or sense of place; environmental; or intellectual traditions and/ or ways of knowing as applied to one or more U.S. ethnic group 

Type of Student Learning Expectations/Outcomes desired in courses:

(Note:  Specific Student Learning Expectations/Outcomes would come from course syllabi.  The Student Learning Expectations in course syllabi should focus on specific U.S. ethnic groups and topics.  Samples of hypothetical Student Learning Expectations are given here to help communicate to faculty examples of what the committee wants students to learn or know.  These are only intended as general examples; however they focus on the cognitive, affective, and interpersonal domains of development.)

Examples:

  • Communicate effectively in writing the perspectives of the Alaskan Natives regarding drilling of oil in the Arctic Wildlife Refuge.
  • Explain the ways that Native American people perceive the skies and how their perspectives are similar and/or different from those expressed in the science of astronomy.
  • Compare and contrast the societal and familial support of adolescent children within the Latino and the dominant US culture.
  • Explain the role that African Americans played during the Civil War for both the North and the South.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of treaties between the United States and tribal nations, identifying the key political eras that supported and/or undermined the status of tribes as sovereign nations.
  • Through biographical studies of African American inventors, trace the impact of these individuals on technologies and economic development of the South.

Diversity Course Submission

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Membership

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On September 28, 2010, the UCC approved a modification of the Diversity Committee’s membership composition:

  • 2 members from University Curriculum Committee (UCC)
  • 1 member from the Liberal Studies Committee (LSC)
  • 1 faculty member from the Commission on Ethnic Diversity (CED)
  • 2 Faculty at Large
  • 1 member from the Academic Advising Council (AAC)

Each spring, the UCC manages the election of the subcommittee’s members who are UCC and Faculty-at-large representatives and obtains the names of the representatives from the LSC, the CED and the AAC, though the UCC does not dictate the process through which those representatives are determined.   All elected members of the committee serve a two-year term. Members who represent the LSC, CED, AAC serve terms at the discretion of the bodies they represent. The Associate Vice Provost for Curriculum and Assessment serves as an ex-officio member of the sub-committee. The committee elects a chair at their first meeting each fall. 

 

2013 – 2014 Membership

Name

Representing

Home Department

Expires

Jean Ann Foley

UCC

College of  Education, Teaching and Learning

2014

Chris Griffin

Liberal Studies Committee

College of Arts and Letters, Philosophy

2014

Karla Hackstaff

Faculty at Large

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Women’s and Gender Studies

2015

John Leung, Chair

Faculty at Large

College of Arts and Letters, History

2014

Mary Roaf

Commission on Ethnic Diversity

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Anthropology

2014

Kathryn Sheridan

Academic Advising Council

University Honors

2014

Gioia Woods

UCC

College of Arts and Letters, Comparative Cultural Studies

2015

 

EX OFFICIO

K. Laurie Dickson

 

Associate Vice Provost – Curriculum and Assessment
Office of Curriculum, Learning Design, and Academic Assessment
Professor of Psychology

 



 

For submission of Diversity proposals, please contact:

Nicole Morrow

Assistant Director
Commencement, Curriculum, and Arizona Transfer and Articulation
Office Curriculum, Learning Design and Academic Assessment

E-mail: Nicole.Morrow@nau.edu
Phone: 523-9561