2013 NAU Global Learning Symposium

The Global Learning Symposium is sponsored by the Center for International Education. The symposium provides a platform for NAU students engaged in globally focused research to present an overview of their projects, including findings. As a result of this symposium, students are able to receive public recognition for their research, members of the campus community are provided an opportunity to learn more about globally focused research at NAU, and the university's commitment to global learning is further underscored. Please find below blurbs on the presentations made by some of the participants in the Global Learning Symposium:

  • GLS Magali ChavezMagali Chavez
    • Senior, International Affairs
    • “The Evolution of the FARC”
    • My project was about The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC). I researched the history of Colombia and the guerilla organization. In my research I also incorporated three women of the FARC and discussed the narratives that they were categorized in based on the novel "Mothers, Monsters, Whores: Women's Violence in Global Politics " by Sjoberg and Gentry.
  • GLS Kelsey CvachKelsey Cvach
    • Senior, Political Science, Public Relations, and Advertising
    • “Egyptian Revolution, 2011”
    • This project explores the 2011 Egyptian revolution. The revolution was initiated by the high price of necessities, inequality, perceived corruption, police brutality and the prevalence of social media. The strategy of non-violence and unification of vastly differing groups contributed to the revolution's successful overthrow of Mubarak.
  • GLS Nathan EdenhoferNathan Edenhofer
    • Senior, International Affairs
    • “Feminicide's Relation to Gender During the Genocide in Guatemala”
    • Guatemala has one of the highest female homicide rates in the world. This killing amounts to a feminicide, with responsibility falling on the state. This is because the state does not offer any protection to women, does punish perpetrators, creating an environment of impunity and normalizing misogyny. The brutality found in the unchecked homicides against women in Guatemala is a result of the brutality and systematic sexual violence that the security forces were trained to use during the Genocide in the 1980's, within the larger civil conflict.
  • GLS Genghan LuGenghan Lu
    • Senior, English
    • “The Democratization of China’s Internet and the Formation of Neo-Leftism and Neo-Rightism”
    • This project is about researching Chinese internet explorers’ political tendency by designing a measurable, visible and comprehensive political compass. My project rationally analyzes the political tendency based on people’s considerations of three dimensions – politics, economy and culture, which innovatively reveals China’s political circumstance currently and reasonably predicts the future of China’s political reformation.
  • GLS Andrew MannAndrew Mann
    • Junior, Forestry
    • “Phoretic Mites Associated With Passalid Beetles In A Tropical Lowland Forest”
    • This is an ongoing project examining the abundance and distribution of phoretic mites found on passalid beetles at Tirimbina Rainforest Center in the Sarapiqui region of Costa Rica. There are nine different mites species that have been found on four different species of beetles. On average, each beetle has contained nine mites with the preferred attachment being on the coxae.
  • GLS Adrian Patel-DelaloyeAdrian Patel-Delaloye
    • Senior, Business Management & Premedical Science
    • “China 2025: Ethnographic Research on Consumer Habit Shifts in Beijing, China”
    • The impacts of decisions made in the world’s largest country rattle the globe. For two months during the summer of 2012, I studied how Chinese nationals are changing their habits in reaction to decreasing space, dwindling resources, and the valuation of the Dollar dropping ever lower in the eyes of the Chinese Yuan.
  • GLS Bo StevensBo Stevens
    • Senior, Environmental Science & Biology
    • “Measuring Habitat Loss in Southwestern Nicaragua”
    • Habitat loss and fragmentation of the tropical dry forest in Nicaragua have devastating effects on species diversity and habitat connectivity. Characterizing land use and land cover changes for broad conservation planning necessitates the use of remotely sensed satellite imagery. Classification of land cover is being developed using the red, green, and near-infrared spectral bands, the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index from SPOT imagery, in addition to terrain variables, aerial photography, and ground truthing data. The resulting land cover map will be used by local agencies to prioritize areas for reforestation and conservation within the province of Rivas, Nicaragua, benefiting local conservation organizations by recognizing the greatest deforestation contributors and highlighting areas that need urgent conservation effort.