Assessment and Accreditation

Computing Accreditation Commission Logo 
The B.S.C.S. degree program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.  The B.S. in Applied Computer Science is not accredited.

Our programs benefit from continuous assessment of learning outcomes and educational objectives mandated by both Northern Arizona University and by the ABET Computing Accreditation Commission.  Results from these assessment activities and discussions with our Computer Science Program Advisory Committee are used to make program and course changes.  This results in programs that better meet the learning needs of students and better meet the demand for graduates who can be successful in their chosen career.  Below are the educational objectives and learning outcomes for the B.S.C.S. program.

Educational objectives and measurable outcomes

Objective 1:  Graduates are technically competent and prepared for leadership and professional practice with strength in design, problem solving, communications and teaming.  

  • Outcome 1.1  Possess professional skills and knowledge of the software design process.
  • Outcome 1.2  Ability to function effectively in both co-located and distributed software development teams.
  • Outcome 1.3  Possess abilities to effectively communicate orally. 
  • Outcome 1.4  Possess abilities to effectively communicate in writing.
  • Outcome 1.5  Abilities in creativity, critical thinking and problem identification, formulation and solving.

Objective 2:  Graduates are grounded in computer science and related mathematical fundamentals and prepared for advanced education and lifelong learning. 

  • Outcome 2.1  Competence in and ability to apply foundational theoretical concepts and skills related to software development, including underlying knowledge of mathematics (including discrete math, linear algebra, and statistics).
  • Outcome 2.2  Familiarity with a broad range of programming languages and paradigms, with practical competence in at least two languages and paradigms.
  • Outcome 2.3  Ability to apply knowledge of formal software development concepts to select and apply software development processes, programming paradigms, and architectural models appropriate to different application contexts.
  • Outcome 2.4  Motivation and skills needed for lifelong learning.
  • Outcome 2.5  Ability to use industry standard Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), debugging support tools, and other modern software development tools.

Objective 3:  Graduates have an understanding of the scope and implications of the rapid and increasing  integration of software-driven technologies into personal and professional spheres of modern society.  

  • Outcome 3.1  Ability to relate a broad education and contemporary issues to software solutions and their impact in a societal and global context.
  • Outcome 3.2  An appreciation and understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.

Objective 4:  Graduates integrate quickly into the workplace or advanced education due to an emphasis on high quality teaching, advising and mentoring. 

  • Outcome 4.1*  Be a leader in educational innovation and the use of technology in providing a quality educational experience.
  • Outcome 4.2*  Attract and retain well-qualified students.
  • Outcome 4.3*  Foster advising and mentoring relationships between faculty and students.
  • Outcome 4.4*  Graduates have accurate, well-formed expectations about workplace or graduate school.

* Outcomes marked with an asterisk relate to unique program characteristics and nature of learning environment; they are essentially “non-learning” program outcomes that articulate central distinguishing characteristics of our program and are therefore not assessed for continuous improvement and accreditation.

Program Enrollment and Degrees Awarded

Computer Science Program

Academic Year

Enrollment Year

Total

Under-graduate

Students

Total

Graduate Students

Degrees

Awarded

1st

2nd

3rd

4th*

PB

Bachelors

Masters

Fall 2013

Full

101

52

49

49

1

252

**

TBD

TBD

Part

8

2

5

7

2

24

**

Fall 2012

Full

85

39

46

37

2

209

**

24

**

Part

3

7

2

9

3

24

**

Fall 2011

Full

67

52

28

42

3

192

**

22

**

Part

5

1

4

10

2

22

**

Fall 2010

Full

83

40

28

35

2

188

**

12

**

Part

1

1

1

9

1

19

**

Fall 2009

Full

67

26

28

29

1

151

**

11

**

Part

2

2

5

4

3

16

**

Fall 2008

Full

53

25

25

21

0

124

**

8

**

Part

4

1

6

3

3

17

**

* 4th year students include all students with more than 90 credit hours except post baccalaureate (PB)

**Number of master’s students are not included because both master’s programs are interdisciplinary within engineering and computer science.  The number across engineering and computer science averages about 30 students and 12 graduates.