Jesse Egbert, PhD

Jesse Egbert Assistant Professor
Northern Arizona University
Applied Linguistics
Blg 23 Rm #BAA 315
Phone: 928-523-6265
Personal Page

Education

  • 2014 - PhD, Applied Linguistics, Northern Arizona University
  • 2013 - Graduate Certificate, Applied Statistics, Northern Arizona University
  • 2010 - MA, Teaching English as a Second Language, Northern Arizona University
  • 2009 - BA, Linguistics, Brigham Young University

Professional Experience

  • 2016 - Present: Assistant Professor, Northern Arizona University
  • 2014 - 2016: Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Interests

register variation, internet language, academic writing, quantitative methods, methodological triangulation

Books

Baker, P. & Egbert, J. (Eds.) (2016). Triangulating methodological approaches in corpus linguistic research. New York: Routledge.

Refereed journal articles (since 2015)

  • Egbert, J. & Biber, D. (forthcoming). Do all roads lead to Rome?: Modeling register variation with factor analysis and discriminant analysis. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory.
  • Biber, D. & Egbert, J. (2016). Register variation on the searchable web: A Multi-Dimensional analysis. Journal of English Linguistics. 44(2): 95-137.
  • Staples, S., Egbert, J., Biber, D. & Gray, B. (2016). Academic writing development at the university: Phrasal and clausal complexity across level of study, discipline, and genre. Written Communication. 33(2): 149-183.
  • Szmrecsanyi, B., Biber, D., Egbert, J. & Franco, K. (2016). Towards more accountability: Modeling ternary genitive variation in Late Modern English. Language Variation and Change. 28(1): 1-29.
  • Biber, D. & Egbert, J. (2015). Using grammatical features for automatic register identification in an unrestricted corpus of documents from the open web. Journal of Research Design and Statistics in Linguistics and Communication Science. 2(1): 3-36.
  • Plonsky, L., Egbert, J., & LaFlair, G. (2015). Bootstrapping in applied linguistics: Assessing its potential using shared data. Applied Linguistics. 36(5): 591-610.
  • Egbert, J. & Plonsky, L. (2015). Success in the abstract: Linguistic and stylistic predictors of conference abstract ratings. Corpora. 10(3): 291-313
  • Egbert, J., Biber, D., & Davies, M. (2015). Developing a bottom-up, user-based method of web register classification. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology. 66(9): 1817-1831
  • Biber, D., Egbert, J., & Davies, M. (2015). Exploring the composition of the searchable web: A corpus-based taxonomy of web registers. Corpora. 10(1): 11-45.
  • Egbert, J. (2015). Sub-register and discipline variation in published academic writing: Investigating statistical interaction in corpus data. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. 20(1): 1-29.

Book chapters (since 2015)

  • Biber, D., & Egbert, J.. (2016). Towards a user-based taxonomy of web registers. In Christoph Schubert & Christina Sanchez-Stockhammer (Eds.), Variational Text Linguistics: Revisiting Register in English, Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.
  • Biber, D., Egbert, J., Gray, B., Oppliger, R., & Szmrecsanyi, B. (2016). Variationist versus text-linguistic approaches to grammatical change in English: Nominal modifiers of head nouns. In Kyto, M. & Paivi, P (Eds.), Handbook of English historical linguistics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Egbert, J., Staples, S., & Biber, D. (2015). Quantitative corpus research. In James Dean Brown and Christine Coombe (Eds.), The Cambridge guide to research in language teaching and learning, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • LaFlair, G., Egbert, J. & Plonsky, L. (2015). Bootstrapping. In Luke Plonsky (Ed.), Advancing quantitative methods in second language research, London: Routledge.
  • Staples, S., Egbert, J., Biber, D., & Conrad, S. (2015). Register variation: A corpus approach. In Deborah Schiffrin, Deborah Tannen, and Heidi Hamilton (Eds.), The handbook of discourse analysis, Oxford: Blackwell. 

Presentations (since 2015)

  • Egbert, J. (2016). “Connecting Corpus linguistics and Language Assessment”. Discussant for Invited Colloquium at American Association for Applied Linguistics 2016. Orlando, FL.
  • Decker, L., Cox, T. & Egbert, J. (2016). “Effects of changing TOEFL cut-off scores: The impact of raising the bar." Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics 2016. Orlando, FL.
  • Baker, P. & Egbert, J. (2015). “Triangulating methodological approaches”. Panel presented at Corpus Linguistics 2015. Lancaster, UK.
  • Biber, D., Egbert, J., & Davies, M. (2015). “A linguistic taxonomy of registers on the searchable web: Distribution, linguistic descriptions, and automatic register identification”. Panel presented at Corpus Linguistics 2015. Lancaster, UK.
  • Staples, S., Egbert, J. & LaFlair, G. (2015). “A Multi-Dimensional Comparison of Oral Proficiency Interviews to Conversation, Academic and Professional Spoken Registers”. Paper presented at Corpus Linguistics 2015. Lancaster, UK.
  • Davies, M. & Egbert, J. (2015). “A Large Corpus-based Study of the Historical Development of [Noun+Noun] Sequences in American English”. Paper presented at the Studies in the History of the English Language Conference, Vancouver, Canada.
  • Egbert, J., Biber, D., & Szmrecsanyi, B. (2015). “The Evolution of the English Genitive: Predicting Diachronic Change in Noun Modifier Use”. Paper presented at the Studies in the History of the English Language Conference, Vancouver, Canada.
  • Egbert, J. (2015). “Mixed Effects Models”. Workshop given at the Germanic Linguistics Annual Conference, Provo, UT.
  • Egbert, J. (2015). “Going Beyond p-values: Making Your Statistical Methods More Rigorous and Robust”. Workshop given at the Germanic Linguistics Annual Conference, Provo, UT.
  • LaFlair, G. & Egbert, J. (2015). “Presenting your Data with R Graphics”. Workshop given at the annual conference of the American Association for Corpus Linguistics.